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Heterogenous Responses to Vasoactive Substances of Canine Superficial and Juxtamedullary Afferent Arterioles

  • Ryuichi Furuya
  • Kazuhisa Ohishi
  • Akihiko Katoh
  • Akira Hishida
  • Nishio Honda
Conference paper

Abstract

It is well known that there are structural and functional differences between superficial and juxtamedullary nephrons. The size of glomeruli and the diameter of afferent arterioles are lager in juxtamedullary nephrons than in superficial nephrons. Also,the single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) in the juxtamedullary nephron is usually 1.5 to 2.5 times greater than in the superficial nephron.2,3

Keywords

Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Vasoactive Substance Afferent Arteriole Arteriolar Resistance Single Nephron Glomerular Filtration Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryuichi Furuya
    • 1
  • Kazuhisa Ohishi
    • 1
  • Akihiko Katoh
    • 1
  • Akira Hishida
    • 1
  • Nishio Honda
    • 1
  1. 1.The First Department of MedicineHamamatsu University School of MedicineHamamatsuJapan

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