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Cathepsin B Efficiently Activets the Soluble and the Tumor Cell Receptor-Bound Form of the Proenzyme Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator (Pro-Upa)

  • H. Kobayashi
  • N. Kanayama
  • M. Schmitt
  • L. Goretzki
  • N. Chucholowski
  • J. Calvete
  • M. Kramer
  • W. A. Günzler
  • F. Jänicke
  • T. Terao
  • H. Graeff
Conference paper

Abstract

Tumor cell invasion and metastasis is a multifactorial process, which at each step may require the action, of proteolytic enzymes such as collagenase, cathepsins, plasmin, or plasminogen activators 1,2. An enzymatically inactive proenzyme form of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (pro-uPA) is secreted by tumor cells 1,3. Cathepsin B, a cysteine-dependent protease, which is elevated in tumors, plays a regulatory role in collagen degradation, since it can convert inactive procollagenase IV to its enzymatically active form 4. We demonstrate that cathepsin B has the capacity to efficiently convert soluble or tumor cell receptor-bound pro-uPA to enzymatically active two-chain uPA. Thus, the cellular protease cathepsin B may substitute for the plasma protease plasmin in the activation of pro-uPA released by tumor cells.

Keywords

Plasminogen Activator U937 Cell Tumor Cell Surface Previous Biochemical Study Tumor Cell Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Kobayashi
    • 1
  • N. Kanayama
    • 1
  • M. Schmitt
    • 2
  • L. Goretzki
    • 2
  • N. Chucholowski
    • 2
  • J. Calvete
    • 3
  • M. Kramer
    • 4
  • W. A. Günzler
    • 5
  • F. Jänicke
    • 2
  • T. Terao
    • 1
  • H. Graeff
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyHamamatsu University School of MedicineHamamatsu, ShizuokaJapan
  2. 2.FrauenklinikTechnischen Universität München im Klinikum rechts der IsarMünchen 80Germany
  3. 3.Max-Plank-Institut für BiochemieMartinsried bei MünchenGermany
  4. 4.Dermatologisches InstitutUniversität HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  5. 5.Grünenthal GmbHStolbergGermany

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