Advertisement

Lipoprotein (A) (LP(A)): Its Relevance to Diabetic Angiopathy

  • T. Taminato
  • F.-N. Hu
  • T. Tominaga
  • S. Sen
  • T. Yoshimi
  • Y. Suzuki
  • M. Nagao
  • Y. Takada
  • A. Takada
Conference paper

Abstract

Lipoprotein(a)(Lp(a)) was first discovered by Berg as a low-density lipoprotein like molecule in 1963. Much of the interest in the Lp(a) stems from several clinical studies that showed a highly significant association between elevated levels of the lipoprotein and susceptibilitiy to coronary artery disease(1). Compelling evidences accumulated in these 10 years indicate that Lp(a) is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Lp(a) is now believed to be independent from serum cholesterol and other risks. Lp(a) is composed of a lipid core, low-density lipoprotein containing an apoprotein B-100 subunit, and a unique lipoprotein ”apoprotein(a)(apo(a))”. The apo(a) subunit is linked by a disulfide bond to the apo B subunit.

Keywords

Diabetic Nephropathy Diabetic Retinopathy Tissue Plasminogen Activator Lipid Core Overt Nephropathy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Dahlen G., Guyton JR., Atter M., Farmer JA., Kautz JA. and Gotto AM.Jr (1974) Association of levels of lipoprotein Lp(a), plasma lipids, and other lipoproteins with coronary artery disease documented by angiography. Circulation 74; 758–765.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    McLean, JW, Tomlinson, JE, Kuang, WJ, Eaton, EY, Fless, GM and Lawn, RM.(1987) cDNA sequence of human apoprotein (a) is homologous to plasminogen. Nature 300;132–137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Morrisett JD, Guyton JR, Gaubatz JW, and Gotto AM. (1987) Lipoprotein(a):structure, metabolism and epidemiology. In: Gotto AM Jr, Ed. Plasma lipoproteins, Amsterdam: Elsevier Science, pp 129–152CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Takada, A., Shizume, K., Ozawa, T., Takahashi, S. and Takada, T. (1986) Characterization of various antibodies against tissue plasminogen activator using highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay. Thromb Res. 42; 63–72.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Smith EB. and Cohran S. (1990) Factors influencing the accumulation in fibrous plaques of lipid derived from low density lipoprotein II: preferential immobilization of lipoprotein(a)(Lp(a)). Atherosclerosis 84:173–181.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Gonzalez-Gronow M., Edelberg JM. and Pizzo SM. (1989) Further characterization of the cellular plasminogen binding sites:evidence that plasminogen 2 and lipoprotein(a) compete for the same site. Biochemistry 28:2374–2377.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Schernthaner, G., Kostner, GM., Dieplinger, R. and Mülhauser, I. (1983) Apolipoproteins(A-I, A-II, Lp(a) lipoprotein and lecithin: Cholesterol acyltransferase activity in diabetes mellitus. Atherosclerosis 49:277–293.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bruckert E., Davidoff P., Grimaldi A., Truffrt J., Giral P., Doumth R., Thervet F. and De Gennes J.L.(1990) Increased serum levels of lipoprotein(a) in diabetes mellitus and their reduction with glycemic control. JAMA 263(1);35–36.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Taminato
    • 1
    • 2
  • F.-N. Hu
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Tominaga
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Sen
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Yoshimi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Suzuki
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Nagao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Takada
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Takada
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Second Department of Medicine, Department of PhysiologyHamamatsu University School of MedicineShizuokaJapan
  2. 2.The Second Department of Medicine, Department of PhysiologyHaibara General HospitalShizuokaJapan

Personalised recommendations