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Supplementary Materials: Publications on Neocarzinostatin or Related Subjects, in English, 1960–1981

  • Shigehiro Matsumoto
  • Hiroshi Maeda
  • Nakao Ishida

Summary

The following list of publications is incorporated in this monograph because earlier publications arc not accessible to many modern computer search systems or have been forgotten because they are too old. Therefore, we want to acknowledge those who dedicated their efforts to clarifying the uniqueness or unknown mystery of NCS at an early stage.

Keywords

Acute Leukemia Antimicrob Agent Electron Spin Resonance Detection Pept Protein Antibiotic Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

I. Reviews

  1. 1.
    Lega SS, Von Haff DO, Rozencweig M, Abraham D, Slavink M, Muggia M (1976) Neocarzinostatin (NSC 157365): a new cancerostatic compound. Oncology (Basel) 33 (5,6): 265–270CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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II. Isolation, Purification, Chemistry, Physicochemistry, and Derivatization

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    Ishida N, Kumagai K, Miyazaki K, Ito M (1960) Carzinostatin, a new antitumor substance. Gann 51:Suppl 56Google Scholar
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    Shoji J (1961) Preliminary studies on the isolation of carzinostatin complex and its characteristics. J Antibiot (Tokyo) Ser A 14: 27–33Google Scholar
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    Ishida N, Miyazaki K, Kumagai K, Rikimaru M (1965) Neocarzinostatin, an antitumor antibiotic of high molecular weight. Isolation, Physicochemical properties and biological activities. J Antibiot (Tokyo) Ser A 18 (2): 64–76Google Scholar
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    Maeda H, Shiraishi H, Onodera S, Ishida N (1973) Conformation of antibiotic protein, neocarzinostatin, studied by plane polarized infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism and optical rotatory dispersion. Int,I Pept Protein Res 5: 19–26CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Maeda H (1973) Chemical reactivity and state of tryptophan residues in neocarzinostatin under physiological condition. J Antibiot (“Tokyo) 26 (12): 776–777CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Samy TSA, Atreyi M, Maeda H, Meienhofer J (1974) Selective tryptophan oxidation in the antitumor protein neocarzinostatin and effects and biologial activity. Biochemistry 13 (5): 1007–1014PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Maeda H (1974) Chemical and biological characterization of succinyl neocarzinostatin. J Antibiot (Tokyo) 27 (5): 303–311CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Maeda H (1974) Preparation of succinyl neocarzinostatin. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 5 (3): 354–355PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Maeda H, Takeshita J (1975) Degradation of neocarzinostatin by blood sera in vitro and its inhibition by DFP and N-ethylmaleimide. Gann 66: 523–526PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Maeda H (1978) Assay of an antitumor protein and its antibody by fluorescence polarization. Clin Chem 24 (12): 2139–2144PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Burger RM. Peisach J. Horwitz SB (1978) Effect of light and oxygen on neocarzinostatin stability and DNA cleaving activity. J Biol Chem 253 (14): 4830–4832Google Scholar
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    Maeda H, Takeshita J, Kanamaru R (1979) A lipophilic derivative of neocarzinostatin: a polymer conjugation of antitumor protein antibiotic. Int J Pept Protein Res 14: 81–87PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Koide Y. Ishii F, Hasuda K, Koyama Y, Edo K, Takamine S, Kitame F, Ishida N (1980) Isolation of a non-protein component and a protein component from neocarzinostatin (NCS) and their biological activities. J Antibiot (Tokyo) 33 (3): 347–351Google Scholar
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    Edo K, Katamine S, Kitame F, Ishida N, Koide Y, Kusano G, Nozoe S (1980) Naphthalenecarboxylic acid from neocarzinostatin (NCS). J Antibiot (Tokyo) 33 (3): 347–351CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Edo K, Iseki S, Ishida N, Horie T, Kusano G, Nozoe S (1980) An electron spin resonance study of a spin adduct of the non-protein component (NPC) of neocarzinostatin. J Antibiot (Tokyo) 33 (12): 1586–1589CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Sheridan RP, Gupta RK (1981) Electron spin resonance detection of free radical in the mercaptan-activation and UV-inactivation of neocarzinostatin. Biochem Biophys Res C’ommun 99 (1): 213–220PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Kappen LS, Napier MA, Goldberg IH (1980) Role of chromophore and nonprotein in neocarzinostatin action. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 77 (4): 1970–1974PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Napier MA, Kappen LS, Goldberg IH (1980) Effect of nonprotein chromophore removal on neocarzinostatin action. Biochemistry 19: 1767–1773PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Kappen LS, Goldberg IH (1980) Stabilization of neocarzinostatin nonprotein chromophore activity by interaction with apoprotein and with HeLa cells. Biochemistry 19: 4786–4790PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Napier MA, Goldberg IH, Hensens OD, Dewey RS, Liesch JM, Albers-Schonberg G (1981) Neocarzinostatin chromophore: presence of a cyclic carbonate subunit and its modification in the structure of other biologically active forms. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 100 (4): 1703–1712PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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III. Cytotoxicity, Mode of Actions, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics

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    Kumagai K (1962) Antitumor activity of carzinostatin. J Antibiot (Tokyo) Ser A 15: 53–59Google Scholar
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    Nishikawa T, Kumagai K, Kudo A, Ishida N (1965) Cytological study on the effect of neocarzinostatin on sarcoma 180 in vivo. J Antibiot (Tokyo) Ser A 18 (5): 223–227Google Scholar
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    Kumagai K, Maeda H, Ishida N (1966) Biological activity of neocarzinostatin and its derivatives. Antimicrob Agents Chemother: 546–550Google Scholar
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    Ono Y, Watanabe Y, Ishida N (1966) Mode of action of neocarzinostatin: inhibition of DNA synthesis and degradation of DNA in Sarem o hum. Biochim Biophys Acta 119: 46–58PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Kumagai K, Ono Y, Nishikawa T, Ishida N (1966) Cytological studies on the effect of neocarzinostatin on HeLa cells. J Antibiot (Tokyo) Ser A 19 (2): 69–74Google Scholar
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    Ono Y, Ito Y, Maeda H, Ishida N (1968) Mode of action of neocarzinostatin: requirement of protein synthesis for neocarzinostatin-induced DNA degradation in Sarcina lutea. Biochim Biophys Acta 155: 616–618PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Kudo K, Saito N, Ohtsuki K, Kikuchi M, Ishida N (1972) Colistin-mediated action of neocarzinostatin, actinomycin and mikamycin of Esherichia coli. J Antibiot (Tokyo) 24: 907–910Google Scholar
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    Kawai Y, Katoh A (1972) Differential inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis by neocarzinostatin in cultured Burkitt’s lymphoma. J Natl Cancer Inst 48: 1535–1538PubMedGoogle Scholar
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IV. Clinical Effects and Studies

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    Sakamoto S, Ogata J, Ikegami K, Maeda H (1978) Effects of systemic administration of neocarzinostatin, a new protein antibiotic, on human bladder cancer. Cancer Treat Rep 62 (3): 453–454PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Sakamoto S, Ogata J, Ikegami K, Maeda H (1980) Chemotherapy for bladder cancer with neocarzinostatin: evaluation of systemic administration. Eur J Cancer 16: 103–113PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Okada K, Kitade F, Kawashima Y, Yamada S, Sakuramoto K, Okajima K (1981) Clinical evaluation of preoperative combined chemotherapy with neocarzinostatin (NCS) and 5-fluorouracil (combined NF therapy) against gastric cancer. Bull Osaka Med Sch 27 (2): 62–78Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigehiro Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Maeda
    • 2
  • Nakao Ishida
    • 3
  1. 1.Kayaku Co. Ltd.Itabashi-ku, Tokyo, 174Japan
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyKumamoto University School of MedicineKumamoto, 860Japan
  3. 3.Sendai Institute of MicrobiologyAoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980Japan

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