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Fossil History of Magnoliid Angiosperms

  • Else Marie Friis
  • Peter R. Crane
  • Kaj Raunsgaard Pedersen

Abstract

The exploration of the origin and diversification of angiosperms has entered an exciting new era. Fresh insights and new results are rapidly accumulating from paleobotany and a wide spectrum of botanical disciplines, and an increasing number of phylogenetic models for seed plant and angiosperm relationships are being developed. Current phylogenetic hypotheses broadly support previous views that the most basal angiosperm taxa fall within a grade of organization corresponding to the subclass Magnoliidae; however, there are divergent views on the resolution of relationships within the magnoliid grade. In part, discrepancies among the results from different analyses reflect difficulties in the polarization of critical reproductive characters, which arise because of the substantial morphological gap between angiosperms and other seed plants and the absence of important angiosperm features (e.g., carpel) in their closest seed plant relatives. These problems are also compounded by the extreme floral diversity among extant Magnoliidae, which ranges from the minute and naked, unisexual, unistaminate/unicarpellate flowers of Hedyosmum (Chloranthaceae) to the large bisexual and multipartite flowers of Magnolia (Magnoliaceae).

Keywords

Late Cretaceous Fossil Record Early Cretaceous Pistillate Flower Systematic Affinity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Else Marie Friis
    • 1
  • Peter R. Crane
    • 2
  • Kaj Raunsgaard Pedersen
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PalaeobotanySwedish Museum of Natural HistoryStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Department of GeologyThe Field MuseumChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Department of GeologyUniversity of AarhusÅrhus CDenmark

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