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The Third Nationwide Survey on Vitamin K Deficiency in Infancy in Japan

  • Takeshi Nagao
  • Yoshiyuki Hanawa
Conference paper

Abstract

The Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan has organized a research committee (chairmen: Kentaro Nakayama and Yoshiyuki Hanawa) on “Idiopathic Vitamin K Deficiency in Infancy since 1980.” The Ministry has funded nationwide surveys on vitamin K deficiency in infancy three times, i.e., in 1980, 1985, and 1988 [1–5]. Questionnaires were sent to the pediatric departments of 1011, 1218, and 1315 hospitals with 200 beds or more, respectively. Return rates were 42%, 40% and 59% respectively. On the surveys, we classified hemorrhage due to vitamin K deficiency as shown in Table 1 [6]. A secondary type is those infants with an apparent cause for vitamin K deficiency such as congenital biliary atresia, neonatal hepatitis, and so on. Infants without these apparent reasons are categorized as idiopathic.

Keywords

Breast Milk Intracranial Hemorrhage Nationwide Survey Oral Vitamin Hemorrhagic Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Nagao
    • 1
  • Yoshiyuki Hanawa
    • 2
  1. 1.Kanagawa Children’s Medical CenterMinami-ku, Yokohama, 232Japan
  2. 2.First Department of PediatricsToho UniversityOota-ku, Tokyo, 143Japan

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