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Immediate Post-war Situation

  • Ifo Institute for Economic Research
  • Sakura Institute of Research

Abstract

Almost fifteen years of continuous war, which started with the Manchurian Incident in 1931, followed by the war between China and Japan and the Pacific War (World War II), ended with Japan’s unconditional surrender to the Allied Forces and its acceptance of the Potsdam Declaration in August 1945, and resulted in the collapse of the Japanese Empire. Japan entered the post-war era with its economy totally crippled by the war. After a period of extreme confusion, Japan began to rise again from the ashes of war and subsequently achieved a miraculous reconstruction and development. In order to examine Japan’s post-war economic development, it is first necessary to ascertain the extent of human and material losses that Japan suffered in World War II and to evaluate the economic and social conditions that existed in the immediate post-war period.

Keywords

Capital Stock Loss Ratio Industrial Output Japanese Economy West German Economy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ifo Institute for Economic Research
  • Sakura Institute of Research

There are no affiliations available

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