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Machine Tool Industry

  • Ifo Institute for Economic Research
  • Sakura Institute of Research

Abstract

Machine tools are machines used to cut, grind, shear or forge metal products into their intended shapes by removing unwanted material. Because processing methods vary so widely, there are many different types of machine tools. They can be grouped, according to the United Nations industry categories (SITC), into cutting machine tools, which include milling machines, lathes and other metal cutting machines, and shaping tools, such as presses, which shape products without cutting away any material (Fig. 19.1-1).

Keywords

Machine Tool Numerical Control Industrial Policy German Firm Price Competitiveness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ifo Institute for Economic Research
  • Sakura Institute of Research

There are no affiliations available

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