Advertisement

Cells, Proteins, and Polymers

  • Hiroyuki Abé
  • Kozaburo Hayashi
  • Masaaki Sato

Keywords

Shear Rate Synovial Fluid Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cell Synovial Fluid Aspiration Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Evans EA (1983) Bending elastic modulus of red blood cell membrane derived from buckling instability in micropipet aspiration tests. Biophys J 43: 27 30 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hochmuth RM, Mohandas N (1972) Uniaxial loading of the red-cell membrane. J Biomech 5: 501–509 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Schmid-Schönbein H, Rieger H, Zander R (1976) Microrheology of erythrocytes and platelets: physiological basis and consequences for the design and the operation of extracorporeal circulatory devices. In: Davids SG, Engell HC (eds) Physiol and Clin Aspects of Oxygenator Design, 163–176 (with permission)Google Scholar
  4. Evans EA, Waugh R, Melnik L (1976) Elastic area compressibility modulus of red cell membrane. Biophys J 16: 585–595 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Evans EA, Waugh R (1977) Osmotic correction to elastic area compressibility measurements on red cell membrane. Biophys J 20: 307–313 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 1.
    Evans EA (1976) New membrane concept applied to the analysis of fluid shear and microipette-deformed red blood cells. Biophys J 13: 941–954 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 2.
    Hochmuth RM, Mohandas N (1972) Uniaxial loading of the red-cell membrane. J Biomech 5: 501–509 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 3.
    Rand RP, Burton AC (1964) Mechanical properties of the red cell membrane I. Menbrane stiffness and intracellular pressure. Biophys J 4: 115–135 (with permission)Google Scholar
  9. Sato M, Levesque MJ, Nerem RM (1987) An application of the micropipette technique to the measurement of the mechanical properties of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. ASME J Biomech Eng 109: 27–34 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Rand RP, Burton AC (1964) Mechanical properties of the red cell membrane I. Membrane stiffness and intracellular pressure. Biophys J 4: 115–135 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Sato M, Levesque MJ, Nerem RM (1987) Micropipette aspiration of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to shear stress. Arteriosclerosis 7: 276–286 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Waugh R, Evans EA (1979) Thermoelasticity of red cell membrane. Biophys J 26: 115–132 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Sung K-LP, Dong C, Schmid-Schönbein GW, Chien S, Skalak R (1988) Leukocyte relaxation properties. Biophys J 54: 331–336 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Hochmuth RM, Buxbaum KL, Evans EA (1980) Temperature dependence of the viscoelastic recovery of red cell membrane. Biophys J 29: 177–182 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Markle DR, Evans EA, Houchmuth RM (1983) Force relaxation and permanent deformation of erythrocyte membrane. Biophys J 43: 27–30 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hochmuth RM, Hampel, III WL (1979) Surface elasticity and viscosity of red cell membrane. J Rheology 23: 669–680 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Waugh R, Evans EA (1976) Viscoelastic properties of erythrocyte membranes of different vertebrate animals. Microvas Res 12: 291–304 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Schmid-Schönbein GW, Sung K-LP, Tözeren H, Skalak R, Chien S (1981) Passive mechanical properties of human leukocytes. Biophys J 36: 243–256 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 1.
    Hochmuth RM, Worthy PR, Evans EA (1979) Red cell extensional recovery and the determination of membrane viscosity. Biophys J 26: 104–114 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 2.
    Waugh RE (1977) Temperature dependence of the elastic properties of red blood cell membrane. Ph.D thesis. Duke UniversityGoogle Scholar
  21. 1.
    Theret DP, Levesque MJ, Sato M, Nerem RM, Wheeler LT (1988) The application of a homogeneous half-space model in the analysis of endothelial cell micropipette measurements. ASME J Biomech Eng 110: 190–199 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 2.
    Sato M, Levesque MJ, Nerem RM (1987) Micropipette aspiration of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells exposed to shear stress. Arteriosclerosis 7: 276–286 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Urry DW (1984) Protein elasticity based on conformations of sequential polypeptides: the biological elastic fiber. J Protein Chem 3: 403–436 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Yonese M, Baba K, Kishimoto H (1988) Stress relaxation of alginal gels crosslinked by various divalent metal ions. Bull Chem Soc Jpn 61: 1857–1863 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Urry DW, Haynes B, Thomas D. Harris RD (1988) A method for fixation of elastin demonstrated by stress/strain characterization. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 151: 686–692 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Urry DW (1988) Entropic elastic processes in protein mechanisms. I. Elastic structure due to an inverse temperature transition and elasticity due to internal chain dynamics. J Protein Chem 7: 1–34 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Urry DW (1988) Entropic elastic processes in protein mechanisms. II. Simple (passive) and coupled (active) development of elastic forces. J Protein Chem 7: 81–114 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Urry DW, Haynes B, Thomas D, Harris RD (1988) A method for fixation of elastin demonstrated by stress/strain characterization. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 151: 686692Google Scholar
  29. Miyakawa K, Ito Y, Kaibara K (1993) Dynamic light scattering study of coacervation of cc-elastin. J Phys Soc Jpn 62: 2511–2515 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Noguchi H, Yang JT (1964) Helix-coil transition of poly-L-glutamic acid film. Biopolymers 2: 175–183 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Urry DW, Haynes B, Zhang H, Harris RD, Prasad KU (1988) Mechanochemical coupling in synthetic polypeptides by modulation of an inverse temperature transition. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 85: 3407–3411 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Urry DW, Harris RD, Prasad KU (1988) Chemical potential driven contraction and relaxation by ionic strength modulation of an inverse temperature transition. J Am Chem Soc 110: 3303–3305 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Urry DW, Haynes B, Zhang H, Harris RD, Prasad KU (1988) Mechanochemical coupling in synthetic polypeptides by modulation of an inverse temperature transition. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 85: 3407–3411 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Urry DW, Harris RD, Prasad KU (1988) Chemical potential driven contraction and relaxation by ionic strength modulation of an inverse temperature transition. J Am Chem Soc 110: 3303–3305 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Noguchi H, Yang JT (1964) Helix-coil transition of poly-L-glutamic acid film. Biopolymers 2: 175 183 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Gekko K, Noguchi H (1979) Compressibility of globular proteins in water at 25°C. J Phys Chem 83: 2706–2714 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Gekko K, Noguchi H (1979) Compressibility of globular proteins in water at 25°C. J Phys Chem 83: 2706 2714 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Yonese M, Baba K, Kishimoto H (1988) Stress relaxation of alginate gels crosslinked by various divalent metal ions. Bull Chem Soc Jpn 61: 1857 1863 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Un-y DW, Okamoto K, Harris RD, Hendrix CF, Long MM (1976) Synthetic, cross-linked polypentapeptide of tropoelastin. Biochemistry 15: 4083 4089 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. OldeDamink LHH, Dijkstra PJ, VanLuyn MJA, Vanwachem PB, Nieuwenhuis P, Feijen J (1995) Changes in the mechanical properties of dermal sheep collagen during in vitro degradation J Biomed Mater Res 29: 139 147 (with permission)Google Scholar
  41. OldeDamink LHH, Dijkstra PJ, VanLuyn MJA, VanWachem PB, Nieuwenhuis P, Feijen J (1995) Changes in the mechanical properties of dermal sheep collagen during in vitro degradation. J Biomed Mater Res 29: 139 147 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Urry DW (1988) Entropic elastic processes in protein mechanisms. I. Elastic structure due to an inverse temperature transition and elasticity due to internal chain dynamics. J Protein Chem 7: 1–34(with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Urry DW (1987) Entropic elastomeric force in protein structure/function. Int J Quantum Biol Symp 14: 261 280 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Urry DW (1987) Entropie elastomeric force in protein structure/function. Int J Quantum Chem: Quantum Biol Symp 14: 261 280 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Urry DW, Haynes B, Harris RD (1986) Temperature dependence of elastin and its polypentapeptide. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 141: 749 755 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Urry DW, Haynes B, Harris RD (1986) Temperature dependence of elastin and its polypentapeptide. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 141: 749 755 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Kaibara K (1995) Role of metal chlorides on self-assembly and function control of proteins. The salt science research foundation annual report 1993, Physiol Food Science pp 243–253Google Scholar
  48. Haynes R H, Burton A C (1959) Role of the non-Newtonian behavior of blood in hemodynamics. Am J Physiol. 197: 943 950 (with permission)Google Scholar
  49. Merril EW, Gilliland ER, Cokelet G, Shin E, Britten A, Wells RE Jr (1963) Rheology of human blood near and at zero flow. Biophysical J 3: 199 213 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Thurston GB (1973) Frequency and shear rate dependence of viscoelasticity of human blood. Biorheology 10: 375 381 (with permission)Google Scholar
  51. Tran-Son-Tay R, Coffey BE, Hochmuth RM (1989) A rheological study of packed red blood cell suspensions with an oscillating ball microrheometer. Biorheology 26: 143 151 (with permission)Google Scholar
  52. Kaibara M and Fukuda E (1969) Non-Newtonian viscosity and dynamic elasticity of blood during clotting. Biorheology 6: 73 84 (with permission)Google Scholar
  53. Wickham LL, Bauersachs RM, Wenby RB, Sowemimo-Coker S, Meiselman HJ, and Elsner R (1990) Red cell aggregation and viscoelaticity of blood from seals, swine and man. Biorheology 27: 191 204 (with permission)Google Scholar
  54. Kaibara M, Fukada E (1982) Transient viscoelastic behavior of blood. Clin Hemorheology 2: 7–11Google Scholar
  55. 1.
    Zydney AL, Oliver III JD, Colton CK (1991) A constitutive equation for the viscosity of stored red cell suspensions: effect of hematocrit, shear rate, and suspending phase. J Rheol 35 (8): 1639–1680CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. 2.
    Brooks DE, Goodwin JW, Seaman GVF (1970) Interaction among erythrocytes under shear. J Appl Physiol 28: 174–177Google Scholar
  57. Brooks DE, Goodwin JW, Seaman GVF (1970) Interaction among erythrocytes under shear. J Appl Physiol 28: 174–177Google Scholar
  58. Usami S, Chien S, Gregersen MI (1969) Viscometric characteristics of blood of the elephant, man, dog, sheep, and goat. Am J Physiol 217 (3): 884–890Google Scholar
  59. Haynes RH (1960) Physical basis of the dependence of blood viscosity on tube radius. Am J Physiol 198: 1193–1200Google Scholar
  60. Chien S, Usami S, Taylor HM, Lundberg JL, Gregersen MI (1966) Effects of hematocrit and plasma proteins on human blood rheology at low shear rates. J Appl Physiol 21 (1): 8187Google Scholar
  61. Whitemore RL (1968) Rheology of the circulation. Pergamon Press, Oxford, p 67Google Scholar
  62. 1.
    Whitemore RL (1968) Rheology of the circulation. Pergamon Press, Oxford, p 71Google Scholar
  63. 2.
    Rutgers R (1962) Rheol Acta 2: 202CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. 3.
    Rand PW, Lacombe E, Hunt HE, Austin WH (1964) Viscosity of normal human blood under normothermic and hyperthermic condition. J Appl Physiol 19: 112–122Google Scholar
  65. 4.
    Chien S, Usami S, Taylor HM, Lundberg JL, Gregersen M (1966) Effects of hematocrit and plasma proteins on human blood rheology. J Appl Physiol 21: 81–87Google Scholar
  66. Merril EW, Gilliland ER, Cokelet G, Shin E, Britten A, Wells RE Jr (1963) Rheology of human blood near and at zero flow. Biophysical J 3: 199–213(with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. 1.
    Higaki H, Murakami T (1995) Role of constituents in synovial fluid and surface layer of articular cartilage in joint lubrication (Part 2): Boundary lubrication by proteins. J Jpn Soc Tribologists 40: 7 (with permission)Google Scholar
  68. 2.
    Higaki H, Murakami T, Nakanishi Y (1995) Boundary lubricating ability of protein and phospholipid in natural synovial joints. Trans Jpn Soc Mech Engrs C 61: 238–243 (with permission)Google Scholar
  69. 3.
    Sasada T, Tsukamoto Y, and Mabuchi K (1988) Biotribology. Sangyo-Tosho, Tokyo, p41 (with permission)Google Scholar
  70. 4.
    Hills BA, Butler BD (1984) Surfactants identified in synovial fluid and their ability to act as boundary lubricants. Ann Rheum Dis 43: 641 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Safari M, Bjelle A, Gudmundsson M, Hogfors C, Granhed H (1990) Clinical assessment of rheumatic diseases using viscoelastic parameters for synovial fluid. Biorheology 27: 659–674 (with permission)Google Scholar
  72. Safari M, Bjelle A, Gudmundsson M, Hogfors C, Granhed H (1990) Clinical assessment of rheumatic diseases using viscoelastic parameters for synovial fluid. Biorheology 27: 659–674 (with permission)Google Scholar
  73. Schurz J, Ribitsch V (1987) Rheology of synovial fluid. Biorheology 24: 385–399Google Scholar
  74. 1.
    Murakami T, Ando H, Higaki H (1995) Viscosity of synovial fluid and related solutions. Preprint 4th Bioengineering Symposium. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Engrs: 63–64 (with permission)Google Scholar
  75. 2.
    Sasada T, Tsukamoto Y, Mabichi K (1988) Biotribology, Sangyo-Tosho, Tokyo, p 44Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroyuki Abé
    • 1
  • Kozaburo Hayashi
    • 2
  • Masaaki Sato
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Machine Intelligence and Systems Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringTohoku UniversityAoba-ku, SendaiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering ScienceOsaka UniversityToyonaka, Osaka, 560Japan
  3. 3.Department of Mechatronics and Precision Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringTohoku UniversityAoba-ku, SendaiJapan

Personalised recommendations