Advertisement

Keywords

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Articular Cartilage Patellar Tendon Extensor Digitorum Longus Sarcomere Length 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Reference(s)

  1. 1.
    Suga H (1990) Ventricular energetics. Physiol Rev 70: 247–277 (with permission)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Suga H, Goto Y (1991) Cardiac oxygen costs of contractility (Err,,,) and mechanical energy (PVA): New key concepts in cardiac energetics. In: Sasayama S, Suga H (eds) Recent Progress in failing heart syndrome. Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg Tokyo, pp 61–115CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Huisman RM, Sipkema P, Westerhof N, Elzinga G (1980) Comparison of models used to calculate left ventricular wall force. Med Biol Eng Comput 18: 133–144 (with permission)Google Scholar
  4. 1.
    De Clerck NM, Claes VA, Brutsaert DL (1977) Force velocity relations of single cardiac muscle cells. J Gen Physiol 69: 221–241CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 2.
    Strang KT, Moss RL (1995) at-adrenergic receptor stimulation decreases maximum shortening velocity of skinned single ventricular myocytes from rats. Circ Res 77:114120Google Scholar
  6. 3.
    Herland JS, Julian FJ, Stephenson DG (1990) Unloaded shortening velocity of skinned rat myocardium: Effects of volatile anesthetics. Am J Physiol 259:H1118—H1125 (with permission)Google Scholar
  7. 4.
    de Tombe PP, ter Keurs HEDJ (1991) Sarcomere dynamics in cat cardiac trabeculae. Circ Res 68: 588–596CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. de Tombe PP, ter Keurs HEDJ (1991) Sarcomere dynamics in cat cardiac trabeculae. Circ Res 68: 588–596CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Le Guennec JY, Peineau N, Argibay JA, Mongo KG, Gamier D (1990) A new method of attachment of isolated mammalian ventricular myocytes for tension recording: Length dependence of passive and active tension. J Mol Cell Cardiol 22: 1083–1093Google Scholar
  10. Shepherd N, Vornanen M, Isenberg G (1990) Force measurements from voltage clamped guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Am J Physiol 258: H452 — H459Google Scholar
  11. Sweitzer NK, Moss RL (1993) Determinants of loaded shortening velocity in single cardiac myocytes permeabilized with a hemolysin. Circ Res 73: 1150–1162CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Strauer BE (1979) Myocardial oxygen consumption in chronic heart disease: Role of wall stress, hypertrophy and coronary reserve. Am J Cardiol 44: 730–740 (with permission)Google Scholar
  13. Burns JW, Covell JW, Myers R, Ross J Jr (1971) Comparison of directly measured left ventricular wall stress and stress calculated from geometric reference figures. Circ Res 28: 611–621 (with permission)Google Scholar
  14. Grossman W, Jones D, McLaurin LP (1975) Wall stress and patterns of hypertrophy in the human left ventricle. J Clin Invest 56: 56–64 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Gunther S, Grossman W (1979) Determinants of ventricular function in pressure-overload hypertrophy in man. Circulation 59: 679–688 (with permission)Google Scholar
  16. Fabiato A, Fabiato F (1978) Myofilament-generated tension oscillations during partial calcium activation and activation dependence of the sarcomere length—tension relation of skinned cardiac cells. J Gen Physiol 72: 667–699 (with permission)Google Scholar
  17. Fabiato A, Fabiato F (1978) Myofilament-generated tension oscillations during partial calcium activation and activation dependence of the sarcomere length—tension relation of skinned cardiac cells..1 Gen Physiol 72:667–699 (with permission)Google Scholar
  18. Tameyasu T (unpublished data)Google Scholar
  19. Fish D, Orenstein J, Bloom S (1984) Passive stiffness of isolated cardiac and skeletal myocytes in the hamster. Circ Res 54: 267–276 (with permission)Google Scholar
  20. Streeter DD Jr, Spotnitz HM, Patel DP, Ross J Jr, Sonnenblick EH (1969) Fiber orientation in the canine left ventricle during diastole and systole. Circ Res 24: 339–347 (with permission)Google Scholar
  21. Omens JH, Fung YC (1989) Residual strain in rat left ventricle. Circ Res 59: 37–45 (with permission)Google Scholar
  22. Yoran C, Covell JW, Ross J Jr (1973) Structural basis for the ascending limb of left ventricular function. Circ Res 32: 297–303 (with permission)Google Scholar
  23. Lee JC, Taylor JFN, Downing SE (1975) A comparison of ventricular weights and geometry in newborn, young, and adult mammals. J Appl Physiol 38: 147–150 (with permission)Google Scholar
  24. 1.
    Brady AJ (1991) Length dependence of passive stiffness in single cardiac myocytes. Am J Physiol 260:H1062—H1071 (with permission)Google Scholar
  25. 2.
    Leijendekker WJ, Gao WD, ter Keurs HEDJ (1990) Unstimulated force during hypoxia of rat cardiac muscle: Stiffness and calcium dependence. Am J Physiol 258:H861—H869 (with permission)Google Scholar
  26. Abe H, Nakamura T, Motomiya M, Konno K, Arai S (1978) Stresses in left ventricular wall and biaxial stress—strain relation of the cardiac muscle fiber for the potassium-arrested heart. Trans ASME J Biomech Eng 100: 116–121CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Halperin HR, Chew PH, Weisfeidt ML, Sagawa K, Humphrey JD, Yin FCP (1987) Transverse stiffness: A method for estimation of myocardial wall stress. Circ Res 61: 695703 (with permission)Google Scholar
  28. Sato M, Hayashi K, Niimi H, Moritake K, Okumura A, Handa H (1979) Axial mechanical properties of arterial walls and their anisotropy. Med Biol Eng Comput 17: 170–176 (with permission)Google Scholar
  29. L’Italien GJ, Chandrasekar NR, Lamuraglia GM, Pevec WC, Dhara S, Warnock DF, Abbott WM (1994) Biaxial elastic properties of rat arteries in vivo: Influence of vascular wall cells on anisotropy. Am J Physiol 267:H574–H579 (with permission)Google Scholar
  30. Tanaka T, Fung YC (1974) Elastic and inelastic properties of the canine aorta and their variation along the aortic tree. J Biomech 7: 357–370 (with permission)Google Scholar
  31. Azuma T, Hasegawa M (1973) Distensibility of the vein: From the architectural point of view. Biorheology 10: 469–479 (with permission)Google Scholar
  32. Patel DJ, Janicki JS, Carew TE (1969) Static anisotropic elastic properties of the aorta in living dogs. Circ Res 25: 765–779 (with permission)Google Scholar
  33. 1.
    Cox RH, Jones AW, Fischer GM (1974) Carotid artery mechanics, connective tissue, and electrolyte changes in puppies. Am J Physiol 227: 563–568 (with permission)Google Scholar
  34. 2.
    Vaishnav RN, Young JT, Janicki JS, Patel DJ (1972) Non-linear anisotropic elastic properties of the canine aorta. Biophys J 12: 1008–1027 (with permission)Google Scholar
  35. Gentle BJ, Gross DR, Chuong CJC, Hwang NHC (1988) Segmental volume distensibility of the canine thoracic aorta in vivo. Atherosclerosis 22: 385–389 (with permission)Google Scholar
  36. Weizsacker HW (1988) Passive elastic properties of the rat abdominal vena cava. Pflügers Arch 412: 147–154Google Scholar
  37. Wesly RLR, Vaishnav RN, Fuchs JCA, Patel DJ, Greenfield JC Jr (1975) Static linear and nonlinear elastic properties of normal and arterialized venous tissue in dog and man. Cire Res 37: 509–520 (with permission)Google Scholar
  38. Weizsacker HW, Pinto JG (1988) Isotropy and anisotropy of the arterial wall. J Biomech 21: 477–487 (with permission)Google Scholar
  39. Vaishnav RN, Vossoughi J, Patel DJ, Cothran LN, Coleman BR, Ison-Franklin EL (1990) Effect of hypertension on elasticity and geometry of aortic tissue from dogs. J Biomech Eng 112: 70–74CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Dobrin PB (1986) Biaxial anisotropy of dog carotid artery: Estimation of circumferential elastic modulus. J Biomech 19: 351–358 (with permission)Google Scholar
  41. Touw DM, Sherebrin MH, Roach MR (1985) The elastic properties of canine abdominal aorta at its branches. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 63: 1378–1383 (with permission)Google Scholar
  42. Mohan D, Melvin JW (1982) Failure properties of passive human aortic tissue. I—Uniaxial tension test. J Biomech 15: 887–902 (with permission)Google Scholar
  43. Patel DJ, Janicki JS, Vaishnav RN, Young JT (1973) Dynamic anisotropic viscoelastic properties of the aorta in living dogs. Circ Res 32: 93–107 (with permission)Google Scholar
  44. Pynadath TI, Mukherjee DP (1977) Dynamic mechanical properties of atherosclerotic aorta. Atherosclerosis 26: 311–318 (with permission)Google Scholar
  45. Carew TE, Vaishnav RN, Patel DJ (1968) Compressibility of the arterial wall. Circ Res 23: 61–68 (with permission)Google Scholar
  46. Lee RT, Richardson G, Loree HM, Grodzinsky AJ, Gharib SA, Schoen FJ, Pandian N (1992) Prediction of mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic tissue by high-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging: An in vitro study. Arterioscler Thromb 12: 1–5 (with permission)Google Scholar
  47. Chuong CJ, Fung YC (1984) Compressibility and constitutive equation of arterial wall in radial compression experiments. J Biomech 17: 35–40 (with permission)Google Scholar
  48. Langewouters GJ, Wesseling KH, Goedhard WJA (1985) The pressure-dependent dynamic elasticity of 35 thoracic and 16 abdominal human aortas in vitro described by a five-component model. J Biomech 18: 613–620 (with permission)Google Scholar
  49. Castle WD, Gow BS (1983) Changes in the microindentation properties of aortic intimai surface during cholesterol feeding of rabbits. Atherosclerosis 47: 251–261 (with permission)Google Scholar
  50. Yu Q, Zhou J, Fung YC (1993) Neutral axis location in bending and Young’s modulus of different layers of arterial wall. Am J Physiol 265:H52—H60 (with permission)Google Scholar
  51. 1.
    Spaan JAE (1985) Coronary diastolic pressure-flow relation and zero flow pressure explained on the basis of intramyocardial compliance. Circ Res 56: 293–309 (with permission)Google Scholar
  52. 2.
    Kajiya F, Tsujioka K, Goto M, Wada Y, Chen X-L, Nakai M, Tadaoka S, Hiramatsu O, Ogasawara Y, Mito K, Tomonaga G (1986) Functional characteristics of intramyocardial capacitance vessels during diastole in the dog. Circ Res 58: 476–485CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Richter HA, Mittermayer CH (1984) Volume elasticity, modulus of elasticity and compliance of normal and arteriosclerotic human aorta. Biorheology 21: 723–734 (with permission)Google Scholar
  54. Newman DL, Gosling RG, Bowden NLR (1971) Changes in aortic distensibility and area ratio with the development of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis 14: 231–240 (with permission)Google Scholar
  55. Bergel DH (1961) The static elastic properties of the arterial wall. J Physiol 156: 445–457 (with permission)Google Scholar
  56. Learoyd BM, Taylor MG (1966) Alterations with age in the viscoelastic properties of human arterial walls. Circ Res 18: 278–292 (with permission)Google Scholar
  57. Hudetz AG, Mark G, Kovach AGB, Kerenyi T, Fody L, Monos E (1981) Biomechanical properties of normal and fibrosclerotic human cerebral arteries. Atherosclerosis 39: 353–365 (with permission)Google Scholar
  58. Nagasawa S, Handa H, Okumura A, Naruo Y, Moritake K, Hayashi K (1979) Mechanical properties of human cerebral arteries. Part I: Effects of age and vascular smooth muscle activation. Surg Neurol 12: 297–304 (with permission)Google Scholar
  59. Cox RH (1978) Comparison of carotid artery mechanics in the rat, rabbit, and dog. Am J Physiol 234:H280–H288 (with permission)Google Scholar
  60. Loree HM, Grodzinsky AJ, Park SY, Gibson U, Lee RT (1994) Static circumferential tangential modulus of human atherosclerotic tissue. J Biomech 27: 195–204 (with permission)Google Scholar
  61. 1.
    Smaje LH, Fraser PA, Clough G (1980) The distensibility of single capillaries and venules in the cat mesentery. Microvasc Res 20: 358–370 (with permission)Google Scholar
  62. 2.
    Intaglietta M, Richardson DR, Tompkins WR (1971) Blood pressure, flow, and elastic properties in microvessels of cat omentum. Am J Physiol 221: 922–928Google Scholar
  63. 3.
    Wiederhielm CA (1965) Distensibility characteristics of small blood vessels. Fed Proc 24: 1075–1084Google Scholar
  64. 4.
    Fung YC, Zweifach BW, Intaglietta M (1966) Elastic environment of the capillary bed. Circ Res 19: 441–461CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Laurent S, Girerd X, Mourad JJ, Lacolley P, Beck L, Boutouyrie P, Mignot JP, Safar M (1994) Elastic modulus of the radial artery wall material is not increased in patients with essential hypertension. Arterioscler Thromb 14: 1223–1231 (with permission)Google Scholar
  66. Aars H (1968) Static load—length characteristics of aortic strips from hypertensive rabbits. Acta Physiol Scand 73: 101–110 (with permission)Google Scholar
  67. Pagani M, Mirsky I, Baig H, Manders WT, Kerkhof P, Vatner SF (1979) Effects of age on aortic pressure—diameter and elastic stiffness—stress relationships in unanesthetized sheep. Circ Res 44: 420–429 (with permission)Google Scholar
  68. Imura T, Yamamoto K, Kanamori K, Mikami T, Yasuda H (1986) Non-invasive ultrasonic measurement of the elastic properties of the human abdominal aorta. Cardiovasc Res 20: 208–214 (with permission)Google Scholar
  69. Greenfield JC, Griggs DM (1963) Relation between pressure and diameter in main pulmonary artery of man. J Appl Physiol 18: 557–559 (with permission)Google Scholar
  70. Farrar DJ, Riley WA, Bond MG, Barnes RN, Love LA (1982) Detection of early atherosclerosis in M. fascicularis with transcutaneous ultrasonic measurement of the elastic properties of the common carotid artery. Texas Heart Inst J 9: 335–343 (with permission)Google Scholar
  71. Matsumoto T, Hayashi K (1994) Mechanical and dimensional adaptation of rat aorta to hypertension. J Biomech Eng 116: 278–283CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Feigl Eo, Peterson LH, Jones AW (1963) Mechanical and chemical properties of arteries in experimental hypertension. J Clin Invest 42: 1640–1647 (with permission)Google Scholar
  73. Patel DJ, DeFreitas F, Greenfield JC, Fry DL (1963) Relationship of radius to pressure along the aorta in living dogs. J Appl Physiol 18: 1111–1117 (with permission)Google Scholar
  74. Hayashi K, Nagasawa S, Naruo Y, Okumura A, Moritake K, Handa H (1980) Mechanical properties of human cerebral arteries. Biorheology 17: 211–218 (with permission)Google Scholar
  75. Hayashi K, Takamizawa K, Nakamura T, Kato T, Tsushima N (1987) Effects of elastase on the stiffness and elastic properties of arterial walls in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Atherosclerosis 66: 259–267 (with permission)Google Scholar
  76. Hayashi K, Ide K, Matsumoto T (1994) Aortic walls in atherosclerotic rabbits —mechanical study. J Biomech Eng 116: 284–293CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. 1.
    Gow BS, Hadfield CD (1979) Circ Res 45: 588CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. 2.
    Hayashi K, Igarashi Y, Takamizawa K (1986) Kitamura K, Abe H, Sagawa K (eds) New Approaches in Cardiac Mechanics. Gordon and Breach, Tokyo, pp 285–294Google Scholar
  79. 3.
    Gow BS, Schonfeld D, Patel DJ (1974) J Biomech 7: 389CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. 4.
    Cox RH (1978) Am J Physiol 234: H533Google Scholar
  81. 5.
    Vatner SF, Pagani M, Manders WT, Pasipoularides AD (1980) J Clin Invest, 65: 5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. 6.
    Patel DJ, Janicki JS (1970) Cire Res 27: 149CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. 7.
    Douglas JE, Greenfield JC Jr. (1970) Circ Res 27: 921CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. 8.
    Gross DR, Hunter JF, Altert JA (1981) J Biomech 14: 613CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. 9.
    Rumberger IA, Nerem,RM, Muir WW (1979) Cardiovasc Res, 13: 413Google Scholar
  86. Hayashi K, Handa H, Nagasawa S, Naruo Y, Okumura A, Moritake K (1980) Stiffness and elastic behaviour of human intracranial and extracranial arteries. J Biomech 13: 175–184 (with permission)Google Scholar
  87. Takamizawa K, Hayashi K (1987) Strain energy density function and uniform strain hypothesis for arterial mechanics. J Biomech 20: 7–17 (with permission)Google Scholar
  88. Fung YC, Fronek K, Patitucci P (1979) Pseudoelasticity of arteries and the choice of its mathematical expression. Am J Physiol 237:H620–H631 (with permission)Google Scholar
  89. Vito RP, Hickey J (1980) The mechanical properties of soft tissues. II. The elastic response of arterial segments. J Biomech 13: 951–957 (with permission)Google Scholar
  90. Hajdu MA, Heistad DD, Siems JE, Baumbach GL (1990) Effects of aging on mechanics and composition of cerebral arterioles in rats. Circ Res 66: 1747–1754 (with permission)Google Scholar
  91. Steiger HJ, Aaslid R, Keller S, Reulen HJ (1989) Strength, elasticity and viscoelastic properties of cerebral aneurysms. Heart Vessels 5: 41–46CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Kawasaki T, Sasayama S, Yagi S, Asakawa T, Hirai T (1987) Non-invasive assessment of the age-related changes in stiffness of major branches of the human arteries. Cardiovasc Res 21: 678–687 (with permission)Google Scholar
  93. Monos E, Contney SJ, Cowley AW, Stekiel WJ (1989) Effect of long-term tilt on mechanical and electrical properties of rat saphenous vein. Am J Physiol 256:H1185—H1191 (with permission)Google Scholar
  94. Cox RH, Detweiler DK (1979) Arterial wall properties and dietary atherosclerosis in the racing greyhound. Am J Physiol 236:H790–797 (with permission)Google Scholar
  95. Cox RH (1977) Effects of age on the mechanical properties of rat carotid artery. Am J Physiol 233:H256—H263 (with permission)Google Scholar
  96. Berry CL, Greenwald SE (1976) Effects of hypertension on the elastic mechanical properties and chemical composition of the rat aorta. Cardiovasc Res 10: 437–451 (with permission)Google Scholar
  97. Cox RH (1979) Comparison of arterial wall mechanics in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats. Am J Physiol 237:H159—H167 (with permission)Google Scholar
  98. Langewouters GJ, Zwart A, Busse R, Wesseling KH (1986) Pressure-diameter relationships of segments of human finger arteries. Clin Phys Physiol Meas 7: 43–55 (with permission)Google Scholar
  99. Matsumoto T, Hayashi K (1994) Mechanical and dimensional adaptation of rat aorta to hypertension. J Biomech Eng 116: 278–283CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  100. Scott S, Ferguson GG, Roach MR (1972) Comparison of the elastic properties of human intracranial arteries and aneurysms. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 50: 328–332 (with permission)Google Scholar
  101. Cox’RH (1976) Mechanics of canine iliac artery smooth muscle in vitro. Am J Physiol 230: 462–470 (with permission)Google Scholar
  102. Cox RH (1978) Passive mechanics and connective tissue composition of canine arteries. Am J Physiol 234:H533—H541 (with permission)Google Scholar
  103. Baumbach GL, Siems JE, Heistad DD (1991) Effects of local reduction in pressure on distensibility and composition of cerebral arterioles. Circ Res 68: 338–351 (with permission)Google Scholar
  104. Cox RH (1976) Effects of norepinephrine on mechanics of arteries in vitro. Am J Physiol 231: 420–425 (with permission)Google Scholar
  105. Cox RH, Jones AW, Swain ML (1976) Mechanics and electrolyte composition of arterial smooth muscle in developing dogs. Am J Physiol 231: 77–83 (with permission)Google Scholar
  106. Hajdu MA, Baumbach GL (1994) Mechanics of large and small cerebral arteries in chronic hypertension. Am J Physiol 266:H1027—H1033 (with permission)Google Scholar
  107. Roach MR, Burton AL (1957) The reason for the shape of the distensibility curves of arteries. Can J Biochem Physiol 35: 681–690CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  108. Hayashi K, Ide K, Matsumoto T (1994) Aortic walls in atherosclerotic rabbits—mechanical study. J Biomech Eng 116: 284–293CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  109. Humphrey JD, Kang T, Sakarda P, Anjanappa M (1993) Computer-aided vascular experimentation: A new electromechanical test system. Ann Biomed Eng 21: 33–43 (with permission)Google Scholar
  110. Deng SX, Tomioka J, Debes JC, Fung YC (1994) New experiments on shear modulus of elasticity of arteries. Am J Physiol 266:H1—H10 (with permission)Google Scholar
  111. van Loon P, Klip W, Bradley EL (1977) Length-force and volume-pressure relationships of arteries. Biorheology 14: 181–201 (with permission)Google Scholar
  112. Chalupnik JD, Daily CH, Merchant HC (1971) Material properties of cerebral blood vessels. Final Report of Contract NoNIH-69–2232, Report No. ME 71–11Google Scholar
  113. Cleave J, Roach MR (1982) Comparison of longitudinal elastic properties of proximal and distal strips of aorta-branch junctions from the abdominal aorta of sheep. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 61: 614–618 (with permission)Google Scholar
  114. Purslow PP (1983) Positional variations in fracture toughness, stiffness and strength of descending thoracic pig aorta. J Biomech 16: 947–953 (with permission)Google Scholar
  115. Haut RC, Garg BD, Metke M, Josa M, Kaye MP (1980) Mechanical properties of the canine aorta following hypercholesterolemia. J Biomech Eng 102: 98–102CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  116. Born GVR, Richardson PD (1990) Mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic lesions. In: Glagov S et al. (eds) Pathology of the human atherosclerotic plaque. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, pp 413–423CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  117. Matsuda M, Nosaka T, Sato M, Oshima N, Fukushima H (1988) Effect of prolonged voluntary running on biochemical and biomechanical properties of rat aorta. J Jpn Coll Angiol 28: 477–480Google Scholar
  118. Lendon CL, Davies MJ, Born GVR, Richardson PD (1991) Atherosclerotic plaque caps are locally weakened when macrophage density is increased. Atherosclerosis 87: 87–90 (with permission)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  119. Abd El-Haleem MA, Sato M, Oshima N (1994) Effect of cholesterol feeding periods on aortic mechanical properties of rabbits. JSME Int J, Ser A 37: 79–86Google Scholar
  120. Bergel DH (1961) The dynamic elastic properties of the arterial wall. J Physiol 156: 458–469 (with permission)Google Scholar
  121. Gow BS, Taylor MG (1968) Measurement of viscoelastic properties of arteries in the living dog. Circ Res 23: 111–122 (with permission)Google Scholar
  122. Learoyd BM, Taylor MG (1966) Alterations with age in the viscoelastic properties of human arterial walls. Circ Res 18: 278–292 (with permission)Google Scholar
  123. Greenwald SE, Newman DL, Denyer HT (1982) Effect of smooth muscle activity on the static and dynamic elastic properties of the rabbit carotid artery. Cardiovasc Res 16: 86–94 (with permission)Google Scholar
  124. Gow BS, Hadfield CD (1979) The elasticity of canine and human coronary arteries with reference to postmortem changes. Circ Res 45: 588–594 (with permission)Google Scholar
  125. Gow BS, Hadfield CD (1979) The elasticity of canine and human coronary arteries with reference to postmortem changes. Circ Res 45: 588–594 (with permission)Google Scholar
  126. Patel DJ, Tucker WK, Janicki JS (1970) Dynamic elastic properties of the aorta in radial direction. J Appl Physiol 28: 578–582 (with permission)Google Scholar
  127. Lee RT, Grodzinsky AJ, Frank EH, Kamm RD, Schoen FJ (1991) Structure-dependent dynamic mechanical behavior of fibrous caps from human atherosclerotic plaques. Circulation 83: 1764–1770 (with permission)Google Scholar
  128. Mashima H, Akazawa K, Kushima H, Fujii K (1973) Graphical analysis and experimental determination of the active statein frog skeletal muscle. Jpn J Physiol 23: 217–240CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  129. Bahler AS (1967) Series elastic component of mammalian skeletal muscle. Am J Physiol 213: 1560–1564 (with permission)Google Scholar
  130. Vance TL, Solomonow M, Baratta R, Zembo M, D’Ambrosia D (1994) Comparison of isometric and load moving length—tension models of two bicompartmental muscles. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 41: 771–781 (with permission)Google Scholar
  131. Vance TL, Solomonow M, Baratta R, Zembo M, D’Ambrosia RD (1994) Comparison of isometric and load moving length—tension models of two biocompartmental muscles. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 41: 771–781 (with permission)Google Scholar
  132. Mashima H, Akazawa K, Kushima H, Fujii K (1972) The force—velocity relation and the viscous-like force in the frog skeletal muscle. Jpn J Physiol 22: 103–120CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  133. Moss RL, Halpern W (1977) Elastic and viscous properties of resting frog skeletal muscle. Biophys J 17: 213–228 (with permission)Google Scholar
  134. Kishino A, Yanagida T (1988) Force measurements by micromanipulation of a single actin filament by glass needles. Nature 334: 74–76 (with permission)Google Scholar
  135. Rack PMH, Westbury DR (1969) The effects of length and stimulus rate on tension in the isometric cat coleus muscle. J Physiol 204: 443–460 (with permission)Google Scholar
  136. Morgan DL, Clafin DR, Julian FJ (1991) Tension as a function of sarcomere length and velocity of shortening in single skeletal muscle fibres of the frog. J Physiol 441: 719–732 (with permission)Google Scholar
  137. Lieber RL, Loren GJ, Friden J (1994) In vivo measurement of human wrist extensor muscle sarcomere length changes. J Neurophysiol 71: 874–991 (with permission)Google Scholar
  138. Wang K, McCarter R, Wright J, Beverly J, Ramirez-Mitchell R (1991) Regulation of skeletal muscle stiffness and elasticity by titin isomers: A test of the segmental extension model of resting tension. Proc Natl Acad Soi USA 88: 7101–7105 (with permission)Google Scholar
  139. Yasuda K, Anazawa T, Ishiwata S (1995) Microscopic analysis of the elastic properties of nebulin in skeletal myofibrils. Biophys J 68: 598–608 (with permission)Google Scholar
  140. Granzier HLM, Wang K (1993) Interplay between passive tension and strong and weak binding cross-bridges in insect indirect flight muscle. A functional dissection by gelsolinmediated thin filament removal. J Gen Physiol 101: 235–270 (with permission)Google Scholar
  141. Granzier HLM, Wang K (1993) Passive tension and stiffness of vertebrate skeletal and insect flight muscles: The contribution of weak crossbridges and elastic filaments. Biophys J 65: 2141–2159 (with permission)Google Scholar
  142. Magid A, Law DJ (1985) Myofibrils bear most of the resting tension in frog skeletal muscle. Science 230: 1280–1282 (with permission)Google Scholar
  143. Deleze JB (1961) The mechanical properties of the Semitendinosus muscle at lengths greater than its length in the body. J Physiol 158: 154–164 (with permission)Google Scholar
  144. Gordon AM, Huxley AF, Julian FJ (1966) The variation in isometric tension with sarcomere length in vertebrate muscle fibres. J Physiol 184: 170–192 (with permission)Google Scholar
  145. Curtin NA, Edman KAP (1994) Force-velocity relation for frog muscle fibres: Effects of moderate fatigue and of intracellular acidification. J Physiol (London) 475: 483–494 (with permission)Google Scholar
  146. Kaneko M, Fuchimoto T, Toji H, Suei K (1981) Training effects on force, velocity and power relationship in human muscle. J Physical Fitness Jpn 30: 86–93Google Scholar
  147. Kawahatsu K, Ikai M (1971) The development of the mechanical power and the force—velocity relation on the human leg extensor. Res.1 Physical Educ 16: 223–232 (with permission)Google Scholar
  148. Petrofsky JS, Phillips CA (1980) The influence of recruitment order and fibre composition on the force—velocity relationship and fatiguability of skeletal muscles in the cat. Med Biol Eng Comput 18: 381–390 (with permission)Google Scholar
  149. Thames MD, Teichholtz LE, Podolsky RJ (1974) Ionic strength and the contraction kinetics of skinned fibers. J Gen Physiol 63: 509–530 (with permission)Google Scholar
  150. Edman KAP (1988) Double-hyperbolic force—velocity relation in frog muscle fibers. J Physiol (London) 404: 301–321 (with permission)Google Scholar
  151. Iwamoto H, Sugaya R, Sugi H (1990) Force—velocity relation of frog skeletal muscle fibres shortening under continuously changing load. J Physiol (London) 422: 185–202 (with permission)Google Scholar
  152. Lännergren JI (1978) The force—velocity relation of isolated twitch and slow muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis. J Physiol (London) 283: 501–521 (with permission)Google Scholar
  153. Hill AV (1938) The heat of shortening and the dynamic constants of muscle. Proc R Soc Lond B126: 136–195 (with permission)Google Scholar
  154. Katz B (1939) The relation between force and speed in muscular contraction. J Physiol (London) 96: 45–64 (with permission)Google Scholar
  155. Mashima H, Akazawa K, Kushima H, Fujii K (1972) The force—velocity relation and the viscous-like force in the frog skeletal muscle. Jpn J Physiol 22: 103–120 (with permission)Google Scholar
  156. Edman KAP, Hwang JC (1977) The force-velocity relationship in vertebrate muscle fibres at varied tonicity of the extracellular medium. J Physiol (London) 269: 255–272 (with permission)Google Scholar
  157. Julian FJ (1971) The effect of calcium on the force-velocity relation of briefly glycerinated frog muscle fibres. J Physiol (London) 218: 117–145 (with permission)Google Scholar
  158. Wilkie DR (1950) The relation between force and velocity in human muscles. J Physiol 110: 249–280 (with permission)Google Scholar
  159. Bigland B, Lippold OCJ (1954) The relation between force, velocity and integrated electrical activity in human muscles. J Physiol 123: 214–224 (with permission)Google Scholar
  160. Chaen S, Oiwa K, Shimmen T, Iwamoto H, Sugi H (1989) Simultaneous recordings of force and sliding movement between a myosin-coated glass microneedle and actin cables in vitro. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86: 1510–1514 (with permission)Google Scholar
  161. Oiwa K, Chaen S, Kamitsubo E, Shimmen T, Sugi H (1990) Steady-state force—velocity relation in the ATP-dependent sliding movement of myosin-coated beads on actin cables in vitro studied with a centrifuge microscope. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87: 7893–7897 (with permission)Google Scholar
  162. Crowder MS, Cooke R (1984) The effect of myosin sulphydryl modification on the mechanics of fibre contraction. J Muscle Res Cell Motil 5: 131–146 (with permission)Google Scholar
  163. Cooke R, Bialek W (1979) Contraction of glycerinated muscle fibers as a function of the ATP concentration. Biophys J 28: 241–258 (with permission)Google Scholar
  164. Pate E, Nakamaye KL, Franks-Skiba K, Yount RG, Cooke R (1991) Mechanics of glycerinated muscle fibers using nonnucleoside triphosphate substrates. Biophys J 59: 598605 (with permission)Google Scholar
  165. Ranatunga KW (1982) Temperature-dependence of shortening velocity and rate of isometric tension development in rat skeletal muscle. J Physiol (London) 329: 465–483 (with permission)Google Scholar
  166. Seow CY, Ford LE (1991) Shortening velocity and power output of skinned muscle fibers from mammals having a 25, 000-fold range of body mass. J Gen Physiol 97: 541–560 (with permission)Google Scholar
  167. Binkhorst RA, Hoofd L, Vissers ACA (1977) Temperature and force—velocity relationship of human muscles. J Appl Physiol 41: 471–475 (with permission)Google Scholar
  168. Ferenczi MA, Goldman YE, Simmons RM (1984) The dependence of force and shortening velocity on substrate concentration in skinned muscle fibres from Rana temporaria. J Physiol (London) 350: 519–543 (with permission)Google Scholar
  169. Joyce GC, Rack PMH (1969) Isotonic lengthening and shortening movements of cat soleus muscle. J Physiol 204: 475–491 (with permission)Google Scholar
  170. Ambrogi-Lorenzini C, Colomo F, Lombardi V (1983) Development of force—velocity relation, stiffness and isometric tension in frog single muscle fibres. J Muscle Res Cell Motil 4: 177–189 (with permission)Google Scholar
  171. Cecchi G, Colomo F, Lombardi V (1978) Force—velocity relation in normal and nitrate-treated frog single muscle fibres during rise of tension in an isometric tetanus. J Physiol (London) 285: 257–273 (with permission)Google Scholar
  172. Cooke R, Pate E (1985) The effects of ADP and phosphate on the contraction of muscle fibers. Biophys J 48: 789–798 (with permission)Google Scholar
  173. Perrin JJ, Edgerton VR (1978) Muscle force—velocity and power—velocity relationships under isokinetic loading. Med Sci Sports 10: 159–166 (with permission)Google Scholar
  174. Abbott BC, Aubert XM (1952) The force exerted by active striated muscle during and after change of length. J Physiol 117: 77–86 (with permission)Google Scholar
  175. Abbott BC, Aubert XM (1952) The force exerted by active striated muscle during and after change of length. J Physiol 117: 77–86 (with permission)Google Scholar
  176. Hill AV (1949) The abrupt transition from rest to activity in muscle. Proc R Soc B 184: 399–420 (with permission)Google Scholar
  177. Bahler AS (1967) Series elastic component of mammalian skeletal muscle. Am J Physiol 213: 1560–1564 (with permission)Google Scholar
  178. Tsuji T, Goto K, Ito K, Nagamachi M (1994) Estimation of human hand impedance during maintenance of posture. Trans SICE 30: 319–328 (with permission)Google Scholar
  179. Hoffer JA, Andressen S (1981) Regulation of soleus muscle stiffness in premammillary cats. J Neurophysiol 45: 267–285 (with permission)Google Scholar
  180. Akazawa K, Milner TE, Stein RB (1983) Modulation of reflex EMG and stiffness in response to stretch of human finger muscle. J Neurophysiol 49: 16–27 (with permission)Google Scholar
  181. Kojima H, Ishijima A, Yanagida T (1994) Direct measurement of stiffness of single actin filaments with and without tropomyosin by in vitro nanomanipulation. Proc Natl Acad Sci 91: 12962–12966 (with permission)Google Scholar
  182. Buchthal F, Kaiser E (1944) Factors determining tension development in skeletal muscle. Acta Physiol Scand 8: 38–74 (with permission)Google Scholar
  183. Lundholm L, Lundholm EM (1966) Length at inactivated contractile elements, length-tension diagram, active state and tone of vascular smooth muscle. Acta Physiol Scand 68: 347–359 (with permission)Google Scholar
  184. Murphy RA, Herlihy JT, Megerman J (1974) Force-generating capacity and contractile protein content of arterial smooth muscle. J Gen Physiol 64: 691–705 (with permission)Google Scholar
  185. Gordon AR, Siegman MJ (1971) Mechanical properties of smooth muscle. II. Active state. Am J Physiol 221: 1250–1254 (with permission)Google Scholar
  186. Uvelius B (1979) Shortening velocity, active force and homogeneity of contraction during electrically evoked twitches in smooth muscle from rabbit urinary bladder. Acta Physiol Scand 106: 481–486 (with permission)Google Scholar
  187. Zupkas PF, Fung YC (1985) Active contractions of ureteral segments. Trans ASME J Biomech Eng 107: 62–67CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  188. Hellstrand P, Johansson B (1975) The force—velocity relation in phasic contractions of venous smooth muscle. Acta Physiol Scand 93: 157–166 (with permission)Google Scholar
  189. Mashima H, Okada T, Okuyama H (1979) The dynamics of contraction in the guinea pig Taenia coli. Jpn J Physiol 29: 85–98CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  190. Peiper U, Laven R, Ehl M (1975) Force velocity relationships in vascular smooth muscle. Pflügers Arch 356: 33–45CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  191. Ekström J, Uvelius B (1981) Length—tension relations of smooth muscle from normal and denervated rat urinary bladders. Acta Physiol Scand 112: 443–447 (with permission)Google Scholar
  192. Sparks Jr HV, Bohr DF (1962) Effect of stretch on passive tension and contractility of isolated vascular smooth muscle. Am J Physiol 202: 835–840 (with permission)Google Scholar
  193. Mulvany MJ, Warshaw DM (1979) The active tension—length curve of vascular smooth muscle related to its cellular components. J Gen Physiol 74: 85–104 (with permission)Google Scholar
  194. Lowy J, Mulvany MJ (1973) Mechanical properties of guinea pig Taenia coli muscles. Acta Physiol Scand 88: 123–136 (with permission)Google Scholar
  195. Mashima H, Yoshida T (1965) Effect of length on the development of tension in guinea-pigs Taenia coli. Jpn J Physiol 15: 463–477CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  196. Ishii N, Takahashi K (1982) Length—tension relation of single smooth muscle cells isolated from the pedal retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis. J Muscle Res Cell Motil 3: 25–38 (with permission)Google Scholar
  197. Gordon AR, Siegman MJ (1971) Mechanical properties of smooth muscle. I. Length—tension and force—velocity relations. Am J Physiol 221: 1243–1249 (with permission)Google Scholar
  198. Weiss RM, Bassett AL, Hoffman BF (1972) Dynamic length—tension curves of cat ureter. Am J Physiol 222: 388–393 (with permission)Google Scholar
  199. Yin FCP, Fung YC (1971) Mechanical properties of isolated mammalian ureteral segments. Am J Physiol 221: 1484–1493 (with permission)Google Scholar
  200. Price JM, Patitucci PJ, Fung YC (1979) Mechanical properties of resting Taenia coli smooth muscle. Am J Physiol 236:C211–0220 (with permission)Google Scholar
  201. Price JM, Patitucci P, Fung YC (1977) Mechanical properties of Taenia coli smooth muscle in spontaneous contraction. Am J Physiol 233:C47–055 (with permission)Google Scholar
  202. Fay FS (1977) Isometric contractile properties of single isolated smooth muscle cells. Nature 265: 553–556 (with permission)Google Scholar
  203. Seow CY, Stephens NL (1989) Changes of tracheal smooth muscle stiffness during an isotonic contraction. Am J Physiol 256:C341—C350 (with permission)Google Scholar
  204. Dobrin PB, Canfield TR (1973) Series elastic and contractile elements in vascular smooth muscle. Circ Res 33: 451 163 (with permission)Google Scholar
  205. Dobrin PB, Canfield T (1977) Identification of smooth muscle series elastic component in intact carotid artery. Am J Physiol 232:H122—H130 (with permission)Google Scholar
  206. Chiba M, Komatsu K (1993) Mechanical responses of the periodontal ligament in the transverse section of the rat mandibular incisor at various velocities of loading in vitro. J Biomech 26: 561–570 (with permission)Google Scholar
  207. Tipton CM, Matthes RD, Martin RK (1978) Influence of age and sex on the strength of the bone—ligament junctions in knee joints of rats. J Bone Joint Surg 60A: 230–234 (with permission)Google Scholar
  208. Schonstrom NR, Hansson TH (1991) Thickness of the human ligamentum flavum as a function of load: An in vitro experimental study. Clin Biomech 6: 19–24 (with permission)Google Scholar
  209. Woo SL-Y, Hollis JM, Roux RD, Gomez MA, Inoue M, Kleiner JB, Akeson WH (1987)Google Scholar
  210. Effects of knee flexion on the structural properties of the rabbit femur—anterior cruciale ligament—tibia complex (FATC). J Biomech 20:557–563 (with permission)Google Scholar
  211. Pring DJ, Amis AA, Coombs RRH (1985) The mechanical properties of human flexor tendons in relation to artificial tendons. J Hand Surg 10B: 331–336 (with permission)Google Scholar
  212. Amiel D, Woo SL-Y, Harwood FL, Akeson WH (1982) The effect of immobilization on collagen turnover in connective tissue: A biochemical-biomechanical correlation. Acta Orthop Scand 53: 325–332 (with permission)Google Scholar
  213. Pierre RKS, Rosen J, Whitesides TE, Szczukowski M, Fleming LL, Hutton WC (1983) The tensile strength of the anterior talofibular ligament. Foot Ankle 4: 83–85 (with permission)Google Scholar
  214. Figgie III HE, Bahniuk EH, Helple KG, Davy DT (1986) The effects of tibial—femoral angle on the failure mechanics of the canine anterior cruciate ligament. J Biomech 19: 89–91 (with permission)Google Scholar
  215. Jackson DW, Grood ES, Wilcox P, Butler DL, Simon TM, Holden JP (1988) The effects of processing techniques on the mechanical properties of bone—anterior cruciate ligament—bone allografts. An experimental study in goats. Am J Sports Med 16: 101–105 (with permission)Google Scholar
  216. Yoganandan N, Pintar F, Butler J, Reinartz J, Sances A, Larson SJ (1989) Dynamic response of human cervical spine ligaments. Spine 14: 1102–1110 (with permission)Google Scholar
  217. Attarian DE, McCrackin HJ, DeVito DP, McElhaney JH, Garrett Jr WE (1985) Biomechanical characteristics of human ankle ligaments. Foot Ankle 6: 54–58 (with permission)Google Scholar
  218. Noyes FR, Delucas JL, Torvik PJ (1974) Biomechanics of anterior cruciate ligament failure: An analysis of strain rate sensitivity and mechanism of failure in primates. J Bone Joint Surg 56A: 236–253 (with permission)Google Scholar
  219. Haut RC, Lancaster RL, DeCamp CE (1992) Mechanical properties of the canine patellar tendon: Some correlations with age and the content of collagen. J Biomech 25: 163–173 (with permission)Google Scholar
  220. Siegler S, Block J, Schneck CD (1988) The mechanical characteristics of the collateral ligaments of the human ankle joint. Foot Ankle 8: 234–242 (with permission)Google Scholar
  221. Soslowsky Li, An CH, Johnson SP, Carpenter JE (1994) Geometric and mechanical properties of the coracoacromial ligament and their relationship to rotator cuff disease. Clin Orthop Relat Res 304: 10–17 (with permission)Google Scholar
  222. Cooper DE, Deng XH, Burstein AL, Warren RF (1993) The strength of the central third patellar tendon graft. Am J Sports Med 21: 818–824 (with permission)Google Scholar
  223. Cabaud HE, Chatty A, Gildengorin V, Feltman RJ (1980) Exercise effect on the strength of the rat anterior cruciate ligament. Am J Sports Med 8: 79–86 (with permission)Google Scholar
  224. Cabaud HE, Rodkey WG, Feagin JA (1979) Experimental studies of acute anterior crociate ligament injury and repair. Am J Sports Med 7: 18–22 (with permission)Google Scholar
  225. Woo SL-Y, Hollis JM, Adams DJ, Lyon RM, Takai S (1991) Tensile properties of human femur—anterior cruciate ligament—tibia complex; the effects of specimen age and orientation. Am J Sports Med, 19: 217–225 (with permission)Google Scholar
  226. Cabaud HE, Rodkey WG, Feagin JA (1979) Experimental studies of acute anterior cruciate ligament injury and repair. Am J Sports Med 7: 18–22 (with permission)Google Scholar
  227. Lyon RM, Woo SL-Y, Hollis JM, Marcin JP, Lee EB (1989) A new device to measure the structural properties of the femur—anterior cruciate ligament—tibia complex. Trans ASME J Biomech Eng 111: 350–354CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  228. Amadio PC, Berglund LI, An KN (1992) Biochemically discrete zones of canine flexor tendon: Evaluation of properties with a new photographic method. J Orthop Res 10: 192204 (with permission)Google Scholar
  229. Gibbson MJ, Butler DL, Grood ES, Bylski-Austrow DI, Levy MS, Noyes FR (1991) Effects of gamma irradiation on the initial mechanical and material properties of goat bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts. J Orthop Res 9: 209–218 (with permission)Google Scholar
  230. Savelberg HHCM, Kooloos JGM, Huiskes R, Kauer JMG (1992) Stiffness of the ligaments of the human wrist joint. J Biomech 25: 369–376 (with permission)Google Scholar
  231. Yamamoto N, Hayashi F, Hayashi K (1992) Mechanical response of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament to overloading. In: Proc 7th Int Conf Biomed Eng, Singapore, 2–4 December, pp 110–112Google Scholar
  232. Woo SL-Y, Orlando CA, Gomez MA, Frank CB, Akeson WH (1986) Tensile properties of the medial collateral ligament as a function of age. J Orthop Res 4: 133–141 (with permission)Google Scholar
  233. Woo SL-Y, Gomez MA, Amiel D, Ritter MA, Gelberman RH, Akeson WH (1981) The effects of exercise on the biomechanical and biochemical properties of swine digital flexor tendons. Trans ASME J Biomech Eng 103: 51–56CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  234. Butler DL, Kay MD, Stouffer DC (1986) Comparison of material properties in fascicle—bone units from human patellar tendon and knee ligaments. J Biomech 19: 425–432 (with permission)Google Scholar
  235. Butler DL, Kay MD, Stouffer DC (1986) Comparison of material properties in fascicle—bone units from human patellar tendon and knee ligaments. J Biomech 19: 425–432 (with permission)Google Scholar
  236. Butler DL, Kay MD, Stouffer DC (1986) Comparison of material properties in fascicle—bone units from human patellar tendon and knee ligaments. J Biomech 19: 425–432 (with permission)Google Scholar
  237. Haut RC, Powlison AC (1990) The effects of test environment and cyclic stretching on the failure properties of human patellar tendon. J Orthop Res 8: 532–540 (with permission)Google Scholar
  238. Butler DL, Kay MD, Stouffer DC (1986) Comparison of material properties in fascicle—bone units from human patellar tendon and knee ligaments. J Biomech 19: 425–432 (with permission)Google Scholar
  239. Danto MI, Woo SL-Y (1993) The mechanical properties of skeletally mature rabbit anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon over a range of strain rates. J Orthop Res 11: 58–67 (with permission)Google Scholar
  240. Danto MI, Woo SL-Y (1993) The mechanical properties of skeletally mature rabbit anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon over a range of strain rates. J Orthop Res 11: 58–67 (with permission)Google Scholar
  241. Keira M, Yasuda K, Kaneda K,Yamamoto N, Hayashi K (in press) Mechanical properties of the anterior cruciate ligament chronically relaxed by elevation of the tibial insertion. J Orthop Res (with permission)Google Scholar
  242. Woo SL-Y, Gomez MA, Seguchi Y, Endo CM, Akeson WH (1983) Measurement of mechanical properties of ligament substance from a bone-ligament—bone preparation. J Orthop Res 1: 22–29 (with permission)Google Scholar
  243. Woo SL-Y, Ritter MA, Amiel D, Sanders TM, Gomez MA, Kuei SC, Garfin SR, Akeson WH (1980) The biomechanical and biochemical properties of swine tendons — long-term effects of exercise on the digital extensors. Connect Tissue Res 7: 177–183 (withpermission)Google Scholar
  244. Woo SL-Y, Gomez MA, Seguchi Y, Endo CM, Akeson WH (1983) Measurement of mechanical properties of ligament substance from a bone—ligament—bone preparation. J Orthop Res 1: 22–29 (with permission)Google Scholar
  245. Nakagawa Y, Hayashi K, Yamamoto N, Nagashima K (1994) The mechanical properties of the white and red muscle tendon in the rabbit Achilles tendon and aging effects. J Exercise Sport Physiol 1: 41–46 (with permission)Google Scholar
  246. Murakami T, Yamamoto N, Hayashi K (1995) Effect of maturation on the in vivo tension and mechanical properties of the rabbit patellar tendon. In: Proc 4th Conf Biomech, Nagoya, 19–20 January, pp 15–16Google Scholar
  247. Yamamoto E, Hayashi K, Yamamoto N (1995) Mechanical properties of collagen fascicles of stress-shielded patellar tendons in the rabbit. In: Proc 1995 Summer Bioeng Conf, Beaver Creek, CO, 28 June-2 July, pp 199–200Google Scholar
  248. Yamamoto N, Hayashi K, Kuriyama H, Ohno K, Yasuda K, Kaneda K (1992) Mechanical properties of the rabbit patellar tendon. Trans ASME J Biomech Eng 114: 332–337CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  249. Yamamoto N, Hayashi K (1993) Effects of strain rate on the mechanical properties of rabbit patellar tendon. In: Proc 3rd Conf Biomech, Tokyo, 20–22 January, pp 63–64Google Scholar
  250. Bigliani LU, Pollock RG, Soslowsky Li, Flatow EL, Pawluk RJ, Mow VC (1992)Google Scholar
  251. Tensile properties of the inferior glenohumeral ligament. J Orthop Res 10:187–197 (with permission)Google Scholar
  252. Carlson GD, Botte MJ, Josephan MS, Newton PO, Davis JLW, Woo SL-Y (1993)Google Scholar
  253. Morphologic and biomechanical comparison of tendons used as free grafts. J Hand Surg 18A:76–82 (with permission)Google Scholar
  254. Pollock CM, Shadwick RE (1994) Relationship between body mass and biomechanical properties of limb tendons in adult mammals. Am J Physiol 266: 1016–1021 (with permission)Google Scholar
  255. Boabighi A, Kuhlmann AN, Kenesi C (1993) The distal ligamentous complex of the scaphoid and the scapho-lunate ligament. An anatomic, histological and biomechanical study. J Hand Surg 18B: 65–69 (with permission)Google Scholar
  256. Chuong CJ, Sacks MS, Johnson Jr RL, Reynolds R (1991) On the anisotropy of the canine diaphragmatic central tendon. J Biomech 24: 563–576 (with permission)Google Scholar
  257. Maeda A, Inoue M, Shino K, Nakata K, Nakamura H, Tanaka M, Seguchi Y, Ono K (1993) Effects of solvent preservation with or without gamma irradiation on the material properties of canine tendon allografts. J Orthop Res 11: 181–189 (with permission)Google Scholar
  258. Butler DL, Guan Y, Kay MD, Cummings JF, Feder SM, Levy MS (1992) Location-dependent variations in the material properties of the anterior cruciate ligament. J Biomech 25: 511–518 (with permission)Google Scholar
  259. Butler DL, Grood ES, Noyes FR, Zernicke RF, Brackett K (1984) Effects of structure and strain measurement technique on the material properties of young human tendons and fascia. J Biomech 17: 579–596 (with permission)Google Scholar
  260. Butler DL, Grood ES, Noyes FR, Zemicke RF, Brackett K (1984) Effects of structure and strain measurement technique on the material properties of young human tendons and fascia. J Biomech 17: 579–596 (with permission)Google Scholar
  261. Butler DL, Grood ES, Noyes FR, Zernicke RF, Brackett K (1984) Effects of structure and strain measurement technique on the material properties of young human tendons and fascia. J Biomech 17: 579–596 (with permission)Google Scholar
  262. Noyes FR, Grood ES (1976) The strength of the anterior cruciate ligament in humans and rhesus monkeys. J Bone Joint Surg 58-B: 1074–1082 (with permission)Google Scholar
  263. Race A, Amis AA (1994) The mechanical properties of the two bundles of the human posterior cruciate ligament. J Biomech 27: 13–24 (with permission)Google Scholar
  264. Woo SL-Y, Orlando CA, Camp JF, Akeson WH (1986) Effects of postmortem storage by freezing on ligament tensile behavior. J Biomech 19: 399–404 (with permission)Google Scholar
  265. Neumann P, Keller TS, Ekstrom L, Perry L, Hansson TH, Spengler DM (1992) Mechanical properties of the human lumbar anterior longitudinal ligament. J Biomech 25: 1185–1194 (with permission)Google Scholar
  266. Woo SL-Y, Peterson RH, Ohland KJ, Sites TJ, Danto MI (1990) The effects of strain rate on the properties of the medial collateral ligament in skeletally immature and mature rabbits: A biomechanical and histological study. J Orthop Res 8: 712–721 (with permission)Google Scholar
  267. Haut RC (1986) The influence of specimen length on the tensile failure properties of tendon collagen. J Biomech 19: 951–955 (with permission)Google Scholar
  268. Rogers GJ, Milthorpe BK, Muratore A, Schindhelm K (1990) Measurement of the mechanical properties of the ovine anterior cruciate ligament bone—ligament—bone complex: A basis for prosthetic evaluation. Biomaterials 11: 89–96 (with permission)Google Scholar
  269. Bosch U, Kasperczyk WJ (1992) Healing of patellar tendon autograft after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction — a process of ligamentization? An experimental study in a sheep model. Am J Sports Med 20: 558–565 (with permission)Google Scholar
  270. Chimich D, Shrive N, Frank C, Marchuk L, Bray R (1992) Water content alters viscoelastic behaviour of the normal adolescent rabbit medial collateral ligament. J Biomech 25: 831–837 (with permission)Google Scholar
  271. Lam TC, Frank CB, Shrive NG (1993) Changes in the cyclic and static relaxations of the rabbit medial collateral ligament complex during maturation. J Biomech 26: 9–17 (with permission)Google Scholar
  272. Pollock CM, Shadwick RE (1994) Relationship between body mass and biomechanical properties of limb tendons in adult mammals. Am J Physiol 266: 1016–1021 (with permission)Google Scholar
  273. Woo SL-Y, Lee TQ, Gomez MA, Sato S, Field FP (1987) Temperature dependent behavior of the canine medical collateral ligament. Trans ASME J Biomech Eng 109: 68–71CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  274. Johnson GA, Tramaglini DM, Levine RE, Ohno K, Choi NY, Woo SL-Y (1994) Tensile and viscoelastic properties of human patellar tendon. J Orthop Res 12: 796–803 (with permission)Google Scholar
  275. Barnett CH, Cobbold AF (1962) Lubrication within living joints. J Bone Joint Surg 44B: 662–674Google Scholar
  276. Radin EL, Paul IL, Pollock D (1970) Animal joint behaviour under excessive loading. Nature 226: 554–555CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  277. Chikama H (1985) The role of the protein and the hyaluronic acid in the synovial fluid in animal joint lubrication. J Jpn Orthop Assoc 59: 559–572Google Scholar
  278. Sasada T, Tsukamoto Y, Mabuchi K (1988) Biotribology, Sangyou-tosyo, Tokyo, p 79 `Mabuchi K, Tsukamoto Y, Obara T, Yamaguchi T (1993) Improvement in the lubricating property of animal joints by the injection of hyaluronic acid. J Jpn Soc Biomaterials 11: 20–26Google Scholar
  279. Higaki H, Murakami T, Nakanishi Y (1995) Boundary lubricating ability of protein and phospholipid in natural synovial joints. Trans Jpn Soc Mech Engrs 61: 3396–3401CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  280. Mabuchi K, Tsukamoto Y, Obara T, Yamaguchi T (1994) The effect of additive hyaluronic acid on animal joints with experimentally reduced lubricating ability. J Biomed Mat Res 28: 865–870 (with permission)Google Scholar
  281. Barnett CH, Cobbold AF (1962) Lubrication within living joints. J Bone Joint Surg 44B: 662–674 (with permission)Google Scholar
  282. Sasada T, Maezawa H (1973) A measurement of the friction in the living human knee joint. J Jpn Soc Lubrication Engrs 18: 901–906 (with permission)Google Scholar
  283. O’Kelly J, Unsworth A, Dowson D, Hall D, Wright V (1978) A study of the role of synovial fluid and its constituents in the friction and lubrication of human hip joints. Eng Med 7: 73–83 (with permission)Google Scholar
  284. Unsworth A, Dowson D,Wright V (1975) The frictional behavior of human synovial joints-Part 1 natural joints. Trans ASME J Lub Tech 97: 369–376CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  285. Clarke IC, Contini R, Kenedi RM (1975) Friction and wear studies of articular cartilage: a scanning electron microscope study. Trans ASME J Lub Tech 97: 358–368CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  286. Higaki H, Murakami T (1994) Role of constituents in synovial fluid and surface layer of articular cartilage in joint lubrication (Part 1) — Experimental Study in Application of Enzyme Digestion. J Jpn Soc Tribol 39: 625–632Google Scholar
  287. Higaki H, Murakami T, Nakanishi Y (1995) Boundary lubricating ability of protein and phospholipid in natural synovial joints. Trans Jpn Soc Mech Eng 61: 3396–3401CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  288. Higaki H, Murakami T (1995) Role of constituents in synovial fluid and surface layer of articular cartilage in joint lubrication (Part 2) — boundary lubrication by proteins. J Jpn Soc Tribol 40: 598–604Google Scholar
  289. O’Kelly J, Unsworth A, Dowson D, Hall DA, Wright V (1978) A study of the role of synovial fluid and its constituents in the friction and lubrication of human hip joints. Eng Med 7: 73–83CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  290. Roberts BJ, Unsworth A, Mian N (1982) Modes of lubrication in human hip joints. Ann Rheum Dis 41: 217–224CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  291. Eisenberg SR, Grodzinsky AJ (1985) Swelling of articular cartilage and other connective tissues: electromechanochemical forces. J Orthop Res 3: 148–159 (with permission)Google Scholar
  292. Schenck Jr RC, Athanasiou KA, Constantinides G, Gomez E (1994) A biomechanical analysis of articular cartilage of the human elbow and a potential relationship to osteochondritis dissecans. Clin Orthop Relat Res 299: 305–312 (with permission)Google Scholar
  293. Mow VC, Kuei SC, Lai WM, Armstrong CG (1980) Biphasic creep and stress relaxation of articular cartilage: theory and experiments. Trans ASME J Biomech Eng 102: 73–84CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  294. Athanasiou KA, Rosenwasser MP, Buckwalter JA, Malinin TI, Mow YC (1991) Interspecies comparisons of in situ intrinsic mechanical properties of distal femoral cartilage. J Orthop Res 9: 330–340 (with permission)Google Scholar
  295. Athanasiou KA, Agarwal A, Dzida FJ (1994) Comparative study of the intrinsic mechanical properties of the human acetabular and femoral head cartilage. J Orthop Res 12: 340–349 (with permission)Google Scholar
  296. Armstrong CG, Mow VC (1982) Variations in the intrinsic mechanical properties of human articular cartilage with age, degeneration, and water content. J Bone Joint Surg 64A: 88–94 (with permission)Google Scholar
  297. Thomas VJ, Jimenez SA, Brighton CT, Brown N (1984) Sequential change in the mechanical properties of viable articular cartilage stored in vitro. J Orthop Res 2: 55–60 (with permission)Google Scholar
  298. Ramaekers JGM (1979) The rheological behaviour of skeletal material originating from several classes of vertebrates. Neth J Zool 29: 166–176 (with permission)Google Scholar
  299. Zhu W, Chem KY, Mow VC (1994) Anisotropic viscoelastic shear properties of bovine meniscus. Clin Orthop Relat Res 306: 34–45 (with permission)Google Scholar
  300. Brown TD, Singerman RI (1986) Experimental determination of the linear biphasic constitutive coefficients of human fetal proximal femoral condroepiphysis. J Biomech 19: 597–605 (with permission)Google Scholar
  301. Woo SL-Y, Simon BR, Kuei SC, Akeson WH (1980) Quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of normal articular cartilage. Trans ASME J Biomech Eng 102: 85–90CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  302. Spit AD, Mak AF, Wassel RP (1989) Nonlinear viscoelastic properties of articular cartilage in shear. J Orthop Res 7: 43–49 (with permission)Google Scholar
  303. Kempson GE (1991) Age-related changes in the tensile properties of human articular cartilage: a comparative study between the femoral head of the hip joint and the talus of the ankle ioint. Biochimica et Bionhvsica Acta 1075: 223–230 (with permission)Google Scholar
  304. Fung YC (1967) Elasticity of soft tissue in simple elongation. Am J Physiol 213: 1532–1544 (with permission)Google Scholar
  305. Clark RE (1973) Stress-strain characteristics of fresh and frozen human aortic and mitral leaflets and chordae tendineae - Implications for clinical use. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 66: 202–208 (with permission)Google Scholar
  306. Clark RE (1973) Stress–strain characteristics of fresh and frozen human aortic and mitral leaflets and chordae tendineae — Implications for clinical use. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 66: 202–208 (with permission)Google Scholar
  307. Lanir Y, Fung YC (1974) Two-dimensional mechanical properties of rabbit skin — II. Experimental results. J Biomech 7: 171–182 (with permission)Google Scholar
  308. Oxlund H, Andreassen TT (1980) The role of hyaluronic acid, collagen and elastin in the mechanical properties of connective tissues. J Anat 131: 611–620 (with permission)Google Scholar
  309. Nilsson T (1982) Biomechanical studies of rabbit abdominal wall. Part I. - The mechanical properties of specimens from different anatomical positions. J Biomech 15: 123–129 (with permission)Google Scholar
  310. Sobin SS, Fung YC, Tremer HM, Rosenquist TH (1972) Elasticity of the pulmonary alveolar microvascular sheet in the cat. Circ Res 30: 440–450 (with permission)Google Scholar
  311. Beel JA, Groswald DE, Luttges MW (1984) Alterations in the mechanical properties of peripheral nerve following crush injury. J Biomech 17: 185–193 (with permission)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroyuki Abé
    • 1
  • Kozaburo Hayashi
    • 2
  • Masaaki Sato
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Machine Intelligence and Systems Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringTohoku UniversityAoba-ku, SendaiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering ScienceOsaka UniversityToyonaka, Osaka, 560Japan
  3. 3.Department of Mechatronics and Precision Engineering, Graduate School of EngineeringTohoku UniversityAoba-ku, SendaiJapan

Personalised recommendations