Does Epinephrine Influence Post-surgical Effluvium?

Chapter

Abstract

Post-surgical effluvium or shock loss is a shedding of the existing hair in and around the transplant area following a hair restoration procedure. Either telogen or anagen effluvium in response to peri-surgical injury is assumed; however, the exact cause of post-surgical effluvium has not been understood. Recently, we performed a pilot control study in order to evaluate the effect of epinephrine in tumescent anesthesia at the recipient area on post-surgical effluvium. Our study suggested that epinephrine is not the main factor that influences post-surgical effluvium at the recipient area. All known risks should be carefully avoided during the pre-, intra-, and post-surgical period. This complication should be carefully discussed with the patient prior to surgery to avoid dissatisfaction.

Keywords

Post-surgical effluvium Epinephrine Hair transplantation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, King Chulalongkorn Memorial HospitalChulalongkorn UniversityBangkokThailand

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