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The Application of Corrosion Protection

  • Hideyuki Kanematsu
  • Dana M. Barry
Chapter

Abstract

As described in detail already, environmentally friendly technology is very important for sustainable developments in the future. Surface Finishing industries are facing a critical point, since many of them have to change their processes completely or find substituted coating substances in order to be environmentally friendly and sustainable. In this chapter we provide and describe some metallic coatings from the viewpoint of corrosion protection, since metallic ions are able to interact with human cells with possible detrimental effects.

Keywords

Hydrogen Embrittlement Lead Free Solder Hexavalent Chromium Alloy Plating Alloy Film 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Institute of Technology, Suzuka CollegeSuzukaJapan
  2. 2.Clarkson’s Departments of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and Electrical & Computer EngineeringClarkson UniversityPotsdamUSA
  3. 3.Center for Advanced Materials Processing (CAMP)Clarkson UniversityPotsdamUSA

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