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Measuring the Services of Durables and Owner Occupied Housing

Chapter
Part of the Advances in Japanese Business and Economics book series (AJBE, volume 11)

Abstract

When a durable good (other than housing) is purchased by a consumer, national Consumer Price Indexes typically attribute all of that expenditure to the period of purchase, even though the use of the good extends beyond the period of purchase.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)TokyoJapan
  3. 3.Nihon University & The University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.The University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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