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A Comparison of Alternative Approaches to Measuring House Price Inflation

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Part of the Advances in Japanese Business and Economics book series (AJBE, volume 11)

Abstract

Some real estate data for sales of detached houses in the Dutch town of “A” is used in order to construct house price indexes using a variety of methods. A main purpose of the paper is to determine whether the different methods generate different empirical results. The data cover 14 quarters of sales, beginning in 2005 and ending in the middle of 2008.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)TokyoJapan
  3. 3.Nihon University & The University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.The University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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