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Conclusion and Policy Implications

  • Noriko O. TsuyaEmail author
  • Minja Kim Choe
  • Feng Wang
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Population Studies book series (BRIEFSPOPULAT)

Abstract

Half century of profound demographic and socioeconomic changes in the three East Asian countries under study has fundamentally altered their social structures as well as life courses and lifestyles of their populations. East Asia has become, as a region, the world’s largest economic powerhouse, with each country having gone through phenomenal economic growth at different periods of time after World War II, leading to rapid improvements in living standards and prolonging life span.

References

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  2. Kwon, Tai-Hwan. 1993. Exploring Socio-cultural Explanations of Fertility Transition in South Korea. In The Revolution in Asian Fertility: Dimensions, Causes, and Implications, ed. Richard Leete and Iqbal Alam, 41–53. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
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  4. Mason, Karen Oppenheim. 1997. Explaining Fertility Transitions. Demography 34 (4): 443–454.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Japan KK 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EconomicsKeio UniversityMinato-kuJapan
  2. 2.East-West CenterHonoluluUSA
  3. 3.Department of SociologyUniversity of California, IrvineIrvineUSA

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