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East Asia: A Region of Shared Cultural Backgrounds and Divergent Economic and Policy Contexts

  • Noriko O. TsuyaEmail author
  • Minja Kim Choe
  • Feng Wang
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Population Studies book series (BRIEFSPOPULAT)

Abstract

The three countries in our study are not only located in the same geographical region of East Asia, they also share many fundamental cultural and social characteristics that make a comparative study of their low fertility interesting and appealing. The cultural backgrounds shared by these East Asian countries can all be traced to the so-called Confucian teachings.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Japan KK 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EconomicsKeio UniversityMinato-kuJapan
  2. 2.East-West CenterHonoluluUSA
  3. 3.Department of SociologyUniversity of California, IrvineIrvineUSA

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