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Introduction

  • Noriko O. TsuyaEmail author
  • Minja Kim Choe
  • Feng Wang
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Population Studies book series (BRIEFSPOPULAT)

Abstract

Three countries in East Asia, Japan, South Korea (referred to as “Korea” hereafter for linguistic simplicity), and mainland China (referred to as “China” hereafter), have now converged to form a region that has among the lowest level of human fertility in the world.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Japan KK 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EconomicsKeio UniversityMinato-kuJapan
  2. 2.East-West CenterHonoluluUSA
  3. 3.Department of SociologyUniversity of California, IrvineIrvineUSA

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