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Post-colonial Industrialisation in Myanmar

  • Toshihiro Kudo
  • Konosuke Odaka

Abstract

Since 1948, the year that it gained political independence, Myanmar (then known as Burma in English) has aimed, in one way or another, economic development through industrialisation. Nevertheless, these efforts remained largely unfulfilled up until the end of the twentieth century. The present chapter will trace and analyse Myanmar’s attempts towards industrialisation in the second half of the twentieth century as well as in the beginning part of the current century, providing a basis for understanding the prospects for successful industrialisation in the near future, as well as some of the potential challenges.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Gross Domestic Product Natural Rubber Economic Liberalisation Tertiary Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© JICA Research Institute 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)TokyoJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Economic ResearchHitotsubashi UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Hosei UniversityTokyoJapan

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