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Agriculture and Rural Development Strategy in Myanmar: With a Focus on the Rice Sector

  • Koichi Fujita

Abstract

Agriculture (including livestock, forestry and fisheries) in Myanmar in 2011 still produced 45 % of the GDP and absorbed roughly 60 % of the labour force (CSO 2010). It is common in the modern world that the share of the agricultural sector in the national economy decreases in the process of economic development, in which nonagricultural sectors such as manufacturing and services grow rapidly, dramatically raising the living standard of the population. Hence, industrialization has been regarded as vital for developing countries that suffer from low income and poverty.

Keywords

Export Price Rice Price Socialist Period Private Trader Rice Export 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© JICA Research Institute 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Economic and Political Dynamics, Center for Southeast Asian StudiesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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