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Growth Structure and Macroeconomy Under Twenty Years of Junta Regime in Myanmar

  • Fumiharu Mieno
  • Koji Kubo

Abstract

The economy of Myanmar in the first part of the twenty-first century has been typified by drastic reforms. Since the middle of 2011, Thein Sein’s new government moved forward to engage in economic reforms under the newly established parliamentary system. Observing this new trend, the international community started to cooperate with the reforms, and various economic cooperation projects and development research projects were initiated.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Exchange Foreign Currency Government Sector Foreign Direct Investment Inflow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© JICA Research Institute 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Economic and Political Dynamics, Center for Southeast Asian StudiesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Bangkok Research CenterInstitute of Developing Economies-Japan External Trade Organization (IDE-JETRO)BangkokThailand

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