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A New Light to Shine? Historical Legacies and Prospects for Myanmar’s Economy

  • Konosuke Odaka

Abstract

Market development is an essential precondition for economic development, that is, an increase in material welfare for each and every member of society. In turn, political stability and mutual trust among members of a society (citizens) are prerequisites for the development of markets.

Keywords

Foreign Investment Colonial Rule Colonial Government British Rule Parliamentary Democracy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© JICA Research Institute 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Economic ResearchHitotsubashi UniversityTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Hosei UniversityTokyoJapan

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