Advertisement

Peat Mapping

  • Sawahiko Shimada
  • Masayuki Takada
  • Hidenori Takahashi

Abstract

This chapter reports the review we conducted on Indonesian peat distribution maps and mapping techniques by using remote sensing and existing peat maps. Existing and available peat maps are listed and introduced how those distributions were derived, viz. Digital Chart of the World (ESRI. The digital chart of the world for use with ARC/INFO software. ESRI, Redlands, 1993), Digital Soil map of the World (FAO. FAO-Unesco Soil Map of the World, 1:5 000 000, Vol. 1, Legend. UNESCO, Paris, p 1, 1974), Land System Maps (RePPProT. Land systems and land suitability series at 1:250,000 scale, Accompanying Maps of Review, Central Kalimantan, Irian Jaya, East whti South Kalimantan, West Kalimantan, Sumatra, Sulawesi, Maluku with Nusa Tenggara, and Jawa with Bali. Regional Physical Planning Programme for Transmigration. UK Overseas Development Administration and Directorate Bina Program. Jakarta, Ministry of Transmigration Programme for Transmigration, 1985–1989), peatland distribution and carbon content maps (Wetlands International 2003–2006) and primeval forests and peatlands moratorium maps (Kementrian Kehutanan. Peta Moratorium Rev. 1–5 Indeks Peta Indikatif Penundaan Izin adalah Peta Lampiran SURAT KEPUTUSAN MENTERI KEHUTANAN REPUBLIK INDONESIA. Skala 1:250.000, Ministry of Forestry, Indonesia http://webgis.dephut.go.id/, 2011–2013). A method and the output map of the peat thickness distribution were also introduced. Peat thickness of Central Kalimantan peat swamp forest was predicted from forest phonology type classified map derived from multi-seasonal NOAA-AVHRR remote sensing imagery.

Keywords

Kalimantan Peat thickness Peatland distribution Remote sensing imagery 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors would like to thank Jack O. Rieley for helpful advice and variable comments. Results shown in this paper were mainly obtained from SATREPS (Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development) project entitled as “Wild fire and carbon management in peat-forest in Indonesia” (2008–2014) founded by JST (Japan Science and Technology Agency) and JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency) and Core University Program between Hokkaido University and LIP (The Indonesian Institute of Sciences) entitled as “Environmental Conservation and Land Use Managemant of Wetland Ecosystem in Southeast Asia” (1997–2006) founded by JSPS (Japan Soceinty of the Promotion of Science).

References

  1. Bruenig EF (1990) Oligotrophic forested wetlands in Borneo. In: Lugo AE, Brinson M, Brown S (Eds) Ecosystems of the world 15, Forested wetlands, Elsevier, pp 299–334Google Scholar
  2. DMA (1992) Digital Chart of the World (DCW), Military Specification, MIL-D-89009, The United States Defense Mapping Agency, 13 Apr 1992Google Scholar
  3. ESRI (1993) The digital chart of the world for use with ARC/INFO software. The Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., RedlandsGoogle Scholar
  4. FAO (1971–1981) FAO-Unesco soil map of the world, 1:5,000,000, Vol. 1–10. UNESCO, ParisGoogle Scholar
  5. FAO (1974) FAO-Unesco soil map of the world, 1:5 000 000, Vol. 1, Legend. UNESCO, ParisGoogle Scholar
  6. FAO (1994) The digital soil map of the world. Land and Water Development Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Version 3.0Google Scholar
  7. FAO (1997) FAO-Unesco soil map of the world revised legend with corrections and updates. ISRIC, WageningenGoogle Scholar
  8. Jaenicke J, Rieley JO, Mott C, Kimman P, Siegert F (2008) Determination of the amount of carbon stored in Indonesian peatlands. Geoderma 147:151–158CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Kementrian Kehutanan (2011–2013) Peta Moratorium Rev. 1–5 Indeks Peta Indikatif Penundaan Izin adalah Peta Lampiran SURAT KEPUTUSAN MENTERI KEHUTANAN REPUBLIK INDONESIA. Skala 1:250.000, Ministry of Forestry, Indonesia (http://webgis.dephut.go.id/)
  10. Lugo AE, Brown S, Brinson MM (1990) Concepts in wetland ecology. In: Lugo AE, Brinson M, Brown S (eds) Forested wetlands, vol 15. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp 53–80Google Scholar
  11. Page SE, Siegert F, Rieley JO, Boehm H-DV, Jaya A, Limin S (2002) The amount of carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indonesia in 1997. Nature 420:61–65CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Page SE, Rieley JO, Banks CJ (2011) Global and regional importance of the tropical peatland carbon pool. Glob Chang Biol 17:798–818CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Polak B (1975) Character and occurrence of peat deposits in the Malaysian tropics. In: Bartstra, Casparie (eds) Modern quaternary research in Southeast Asia, vol 1. A. A. Balkema, Rotterdam, pp 71–81Google Scholar
  14. Poniman A, Nurwadjedi and Lumban-Tobing P (2004) Developing the national land resource database for supporting spatial land use planning. In: 3rd FIG regional conference, Jakarta, Indonesia, The International Federation of Surveyors, 3–7 Oct 2004Google Scholar
  15. RePPProT (1985–1989) Land systems and land suitability series at 1:250,000 scale, Accompanying Maps of Review, Central Kalimantan, Irian Jaya, East whti South Kalimantan, West Kalimantan, Sumatra, Sulawesi, Maluku with Nusa Tenggara, and Jawa with Bali. Regional Physical Planning Programme for Transmigration. UK Overseas Development Administration and Directorate Bina Program. Jakarta, Ministry of Transmigration Programme for TransmigrationGoogle Scholar
  16. RePPProT (1990) The land resources of Indonesia: a national overview. The regional physical planning programme for transmigration. UK Overseas Development Administration and Directorate Bina Program, Ministry of Transmigration, JakartaGoogle Scholar
  17. Shimada S (2003) Estimation of peat thickness of peat swamp forests in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia using multi-temporal satellite data. J Jpn Peat Soc 2(1):26–33Google Scholar
  18. Shimada S, Takahashi H, Kaneko M, Toyoda H (2004) Predicting peat layer mass using remote sensing data in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. In: Mihara M, Yamaji E (eds) Participatory strategy for soil and water conservation, institute of environment rehabilitation and conservation. Soubun Co., Ltd, Japan, pp 193–196Google Scholar
  19. Vartapetian BB, Jackson MB (1997) Plant adaptations to anaerobic stress. Ann Bot 79(suppl A):3–20CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Wahyunto, Suryadiputra NN (2008) Peatland distribution in Sumatra and Kalimantan – explanation of its data sets including source of information, accuracy, data constraints and gaps. Wetlands International Indonesia Programme, BogorGoogle Scholar
  21. Wahyunto, Ritung S, Subagjo H (2003) Maps of area of peatland distribution and carbon content in Sumatra, 1990–2002. Wetlands International – Indonesia Programme & Wildlife Habitat Canada (WHC), BogorGoogle Scholar
  22. Wahyunto E, Ritung S, Suparto W, Subagjo H (2004) Maps of area of peatland distribution and carbon content in Kalimantan, 2000–2002. Wetlands International – Indonesia Programme & Wildlife Habitat Canada (WHC), BogorGoogle Scholar
  23. Wahyunto, Heryanto B, Bekti H, Widiastuti F (2006) Maps of peatland distribution, area and carbon content in Papua, 2000–2001. Wetlands International – Indonesia Programme & Wildlife Habitat Canada (WHC), BogorGoogle Scholar
  24. Wetland International (2003–2006) Maps of area of peatland distribution and carbon content in Sumatra (Wahyunto, S Ritung and H Subagjo, 2003), in Kalimantan (Wahyunto et al. 2004), and in Papua (Wahyunto et al. 2006). Wetland International – Indonesia Programme and Wildlife Habitat Canada (WHC)Google Scholar
  25. Whitmore TC (1975) Tropical rain forest of the far east. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sawahiko Shimada
    • 1
  • Masayuki Takada
    • 2
  • Hidenori Takahashi
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Regional Environment ScienceTokyo University of AgricultureSetagayaJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of Humanity and EnvironmentHosei UniversityTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Hokkaido Institute of Hydro-climateTeine-ku, Sapporo CityJapan

Personalised recommendations