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Radioactive Waste Disposal

  • Yuichi Niibori
Part of the An Advanced Course in Nuclear Engineering book series (ACNE)

Abstract

The first concept of geological disposal proposed in history is probably the direct disposal of high-level radioactive liquid wastes in salt formations indicated in a 1957 report [1] prepared by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The concept, however, differs considerably from today’s concept of geological disposal in that, for example, the plan in those days was to directly inject liquid waste and the time span considered was only 600 years. The basic ideas of today’s disposal systems are from the concept indicated in the so-called Polvani Report [2] in the 1970s and the KBS concept [3] developed in Sweden in the early 1980s. The basis, therefore, had been established by the end of the 1980s. Today, R&D on geological disposal systems is underway in more than 30 countries [4].

Keywords

Radioactive Waste Waste Form Disposal Facility Disposal System Geological Disposal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Authors 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Quantum Science and Energy EngineeringTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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