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Abstract

The term “clearance” refers to the idea that if an exposure dose due to a very low-level artificial radioactive material is sufficiently smaller than natural background radiation and human health risk is negligibly small, that artificial radioactive material does not need to be treated as a radioactive material, and therefore the material may be released from regulatory control even if the category to which the material belongs is under regulatory control for radiation protection.

Keywords

International Atomic Energy Agency Radioactivity Concentration Reactor Facility Evaluation Pathway Recycle Coarse Aggregate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Authors 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Japan Atomic Energy AgencyTokaiJapan

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