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The IMF and Canada: From Floating to Fixed Exchange Rates

  • Ayumu Sugawara
Part of the Studies in Economic History book series (SEH)

Abstract

A key element in the 1944 Articles of Agreement of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) was fixed exchange rates. However, while most IMF member countries sought to establish or maintain fixed exchange rates in the 1950s, the Canadian government placed the Canadian dollar under a flexible exchange rate regime. Canada began using a flexible rate in September 1950 and returned to a fixed rate in May 1962.

Keywords

Exchange Rate International Monetary Fund Current Account Deficit Canadian Dollar Capital Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author thanks the Bank of Canada for permission to access the Archives. I am also grateful to Mariko Hatase, Masato Masuda, Tomonori Naito, Masanori Sato, Masato Shizume, and Yasuo Takatsuki for their helpful comments to the earlier drafts.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EconomicsTohoku UniversitySendaiJapan

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