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Independent Existence Theory Forming Indirect Effects and Its Three Examples: Congestion Easing, Scale Enlargement of Factory·Warehouse, and Marshallian External Economies

  • Hirotada Kohno
Chapter
Part of the New Frontiers in Regional Science: Asian Perspectives book series (NFRSASIPER, volume 1)

Abstract

I cannot, by all means, cast my lot with the transfer theory that all of what is called to be indirect effects is nothing but having transferred from the direct effects (the user himself forms those (a) by himself, (b) on the expressway, and (c) instantaneously), although I consent to the ordinary transfer phenomena of course (see the foregoing chapter).

Keywords

Selling Price Cost Curve Scale Enlargement Individual Enterprise External Economy 
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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hirotada Kohno
    • 1
  1. 1.Professor Emeritus University of TsukubaTsukubaJapan

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