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The Vulnerability of Toilet Facilities in the Bangladesh Rural Area and Sanitary Improvement by Introduction of the Eco San Toilet

  • Kunio TakahashiEmail author
  • Akira Sakai
  • Tofayel Ahmed
Part of the New Frontiers in Regional Science: Asian Perspectives book series (NFRSASIPER, volume 4)

Abstract

Bangladesh is a very densely populated agricultural nation and characterized by a tropical monsoon climate and most of the country consists of flat lowlands and a vast delta. Such weather and geographical conditions and vulnerable facilities such as embankment cause severe floods about once in 10 years. On the other hand, the spread of toilets called a ‘low-cost Pit Latrine’ by the government and international organizations was extended. But with poor management, the Pit Latrine cannot be considered a sustainable and sanitary facility with adverse environmental impact. An appropriate technology for toilets needs to contribute to sanitary improvement and the resource use of human excreta and it should lead to the conservation of the quality of water. The ecological sanitation (henceforth, Eco San) toilet suits the above needs. The present study examined the sanitary improvement effect and benefit evaluation of the Eco San toilet. As the results, the Eco San toilet improves the state of toilets, and reduces household expenditure through mitigation of waterborne diseases. Considering the average medical expenditures, the benefits will be about 2,000 BDT/year/household. And it cannot be emphasized enough that such a result can be achieved through the proper management.

Keywords

Ecological sanitation Sanitary improvement Resourceful use Human excreta Benefit evaluation 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Japan Association of Drainage and EnvironmentTokyoJapan
  2. 2.University of Marketing and Distribution SciencesKobeJapan
  3. 3.Japan Association of Drainage and Environment Bangladesh OfficeDhakaBangladesh

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