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Anthropological Research Methods in Business Administration: Migration and Translation Within the Social Sciences

  • Yoshiyuki Takeuchi
Part of the Translational Systems Sciences book series (TSS, volume 4)

Abstract

In this chapter, I consider the advantages and reasons for employing anthropological methods within business administration studies. I examine the rationale for using anthropological methods not only for targeted issues but also from social science methodological perspectives. I begin by briefly examining the purposes for which anthropological methods have been employed in previous studies on business. I then demonstrate a progression in the use of anthropological methods for studying globalization issues. Regarding methodological perspectives, I discuss two issues. The first concerns problems related to the use of a (social) science outside of its birthplace or its original context. Questioning the universality of science, I discuss the translation and transposition of science using migration as a metaphor. The second issue concerns the social constructionism perspective that considers science as a social construct. This implies contingency and emphasizes a process-as-construction approach. I suggest that these features of social constructionism are applicable to business studies. Using an illustrative example from the use of numbers, I conclude that science and scientific observation are neither always value neutral nor are they culturally neutral. Anthropological methods are evidently valuable for recovering the context that is stripped away and unavailable for scientific observation.

Keywords

Social Constructionism Business Study Globalization Study Business Administration Scientific Observation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of EconomicsOsaka UniversityToyonakaJapan

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