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Challenges and Goal of the Sustainable Island: Case Study in UNESCO Shinan Dadohae Biosphere Reserve, Korea

  • Sun-Kee HongEmail author
  • Heon-Jong Lee
  • Bong-Ryong Kang
  • Jae-Eun Kim
  • Kyoung-Ah Lee
  • Kyoung-Wan Kim
  • Dae-Hoon Jang
Chapter
Part of the Ecological Research Monographs book series (ECOLOGICAL)

Abstract

The Republic of Korea has more than 3,400 large and small islands. About 60 % of these islands are located in the southwestern Jeollanam-do Province, which also includes a huge tidal flat wetland. Because of high biodiversity in the tidal flat ecosystem and a healthy oceanic ecosystem, this area was designated as Dadohae Haesang National Park in 1981. Shinan Dadohae, including Heuksan Do-Hong Do (-Do corresponds to Island) and Bigeum Do-Docho Do, are well known for their island vegetation, migratory birds, and biodiversity. Jeung-Do, famous for its tidal flat ecosystem and biodiversity, was designated a Provincial Park of Jeollanam-do. The excellence of ecosystem, landscape, and cultural attributes gave significant reasons to designate these areas as the 3rd UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in the Republic of Korea in 2009. Since this designation, research has been carried out to develop a management plan for sustainable development based on a balance of human and natural systems in biosphere reserve areas. In the management plan, several special strategies related to global climate change and a low carbon society were adopted, such as to monitor changing socioeconomic standards as well as to monitor changing ecosystems of island and coastal environments. Because education on sustainable use of energy and resources is also an important issue in the island system for accomplishing a low carbon society, this was also included. The most important issue in the management plan, however, is related to the environmental adaptation process of human society on islands, given that these areas are limited resource areas.

Keywords

Comprehensive management system Korea Shinan Dadohae Bioshpere Reserve Sustainable Island 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was funded by Jeonnam Green Environment Center, Jeollanam-do. This work was also supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant by the Korean Government (MEST)”(NRF-2009-361-A00007). Our thanks to UNESCO MAB Korea and Jeollanam-do Province, Republic of Korea for their valuable information. This paper was presented in 8th IALE World Congress at Beijing, China (18–23 August 2011).

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sun-Kee Hong
    • 1
    Email author
  • Heon-Jong Lee
    • 2
  • Bong-Ryong Kang
    • 3
  • Jae-Eun Kim
    • 1
  • Kyoung-Ah Lee
    • 1
  • Kyoung-Wan Kim
    • 1
  • Dae-Hoon Jang
    • 1
  1. 1.Institution for Marine and Island CulturesMokpo National UniversityJeonnamRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of ArcheologyMokpo National UniversityJeonnamRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of HistoryMokpo National UniversityJeonnamRepublic of Korea

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