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History of JEOL Electron Microscopes

  • Nagamitsu Yoshimura
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology book series (BRIEFSAPPLSCIENCES)

Abstract

It could be said that the electron microscope was first invented by Knoll and Ruska (in Germany). Borries and Ruska (Siemens-Halske) developed the 100 kV EM 1932, whose resolution was 10 nm, which would be the first birth of the electron microscope in the world. About 10 years later Hitachi and Toshiba in Japan developed the electron microscope, respectively 1941.

JEOL challenged developing EM, a little bit later. The birth of AD-1 EM, assembled on a wood table, was the debut of our company, JEOL. It was September 1947, a few years after the end of the Pacific War.

Keywords

Lens System JEOL Electron Microscope Condenser Lens Specimen Stage Wood Table 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nagamitsu Yoshimura
    • 1
  1. 1.Kokubunji TokyoJapan

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