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The Roles of the Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), UniMAP in NCER: From Nanotechnology Perspectives

  • U. Hashim
  • E. N. Elliazir
  • Jasni M. Ismail
  • A. R. Ruslinda
  • M. K. Md. Arshad
Conference paper

Abstract

Established in August 2008 and recognized as the NanoMalaysia Centre of Excellence in June 2011, the Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE) of the Universiti Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP) is now a national prominence research institution focusing on nanotechnology in Malaysia. Towards becoming a reference center, INEE’s laboratories are designed to be equipped with the state-of-the-art technology at low operational cost. INEE’s research capabilities range from basic to advanced methodologies led by expert research fellows; major fields include nanobiosensors, active/functionalized nanostructures, and passive nanostructures. The fabrication and testing capabilities have attracted users nationwide, generating income for future expansion. Strong partnership in research collaboration with local research universities and international counterparts, i.e., the University of Warwick, the University of Hull, and the Imperial College of London, has been established. INEE is all geared up to be part of the Northern Corridor Economic Region (NCER) agenda, to enhance NCER’s role in establishing contribution to technology advancement. Mutually benefiting, NCER would be an excellent platform to instill public awareness, educate enthusiasts, encourage research, and inspire entrepreneurship in nanotechnology. This paper presents the current status of development of INEE, UniMAP, and its roles in NCER.

Keywords

International Partner National Agenda Fellow Researcher Malaysian Government Nanophotonic Device 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The authors would like to express their deepest gratitude to INEE’s team and UniMAP.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Hashim
    • 1
  • E. N. Elliazir
    • 1
  • Jasni M. Ismail
    • 1
  • A. R. Ruslinda
    • 1
  • M. K. Md. Arshad
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Nano Electronic EngineeringUniversiti Malaysia PerlisKangar PerlisMalaysia

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