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A Survey on Recent Developments

  • Ryuzo Sato
  • Rama V. Ramachandran
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Japanese Business and Economics book series (AJBE, volume 1)

Abstract

The recent book by Vincent Martinet (2012) on Economic Theory and Sustainable Development: What Can We Preserve for Future, illustrates how far we came and how much we have achieved in the theory of growth and economic invariance. This book is about ecological economics but utilizes group theory and Noether’s invariance principle to derive meaningful theoretical propositions.

Keywords

Total Factor Productivity Technical Change Exhaustible Resource Infinitesimal Transformation Total Factor Productivity Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryuzo Sato
    • 1
  • Rama V. Ramachandran
    • 2
  1. 1.Stern School of BusinessNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Pebble Brook LanePlanoUSA

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