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Quantity or Quality: The Impact of Labour Saving Innovation on US and Japanese Growth Rates, 1960–2004

  • Ryuzo Sato
  • Rama V. Ramachandran
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Japanese Business and Economics book series (AJBE, volume 1)

Abstract

Japan’s economic growth after the World War II was miraculous. Hundreds of economic studies have been done to analyse the high performance of the economy. Recently, however, attention has turned to worrisome expectations for the future. Will Japan’s population decline put an end to the country’s macroeconomic growth?

Keywords

Production Function Total Factor Productivity Technical Change Technical Progress Japanese Economy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to acknowledge helpful criticism by the anonymous referee, Kazuo Mino, Masao Fukuoka and Masako Murakami. We also thank Donna Amoroso and Patricia Decker for editorial assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryuzo Sato
    • 1
  • Rama V. Ramachandran
    • 2
  1. 1.Stern School of BusinessNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Pebble Brook LanePlanoUSA

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