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Status of Biodiversity Loss in Lakes and Ponds in Japan

  • Noriko Takamura
Chapter
Part of the Ecological Research Monographs book series (ECOLOGICAL)

Abstract

Water is essential for life. In Japan we use approximately 83.1 billion m3 of water per year, 87% of which is derived from rivers and lakes and 13% from groundwater. To satisfy our water demand, the Japanese government constructed about 3,000 reservoirs (with bank heights ≥15.0 m) during the latter half of the twentieth century, and these reservoirs produce another 23.8 billion m3 of available water (Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport, and Tourism of Japan 2010; Japan Dam Foundation 2007). In addition, Japan imports large quantities of food estimated to be equivalent to 74.4 billion m3 of virtual water annually (Oki and Kanae 2004).

Keywords

Total Phosphorus Particulated Organic Carbon Dissolve Organic Nitrogen Largemouth Bass Biodiversity Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

I thank M. Nakagawa, at NIES, for her help in drawing figures. The publication of this study was encouraged by the partial support of the Environmental Research and Technology Development Fund (S9) of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Institute for Environmental StudiesTsukubaJapan

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