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Cytopathological Aspects of EUS-FNA

  • Vijayshri Pethe-Bhide
  • Amol Bapaye

Abstract

Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a procedure wherein cells are aspirated from a lesion/tumor using a needle and syringe by applying negative pressure [1]. The aspirated material contains cells, either isolated or in clusters. Cell morphology, nuclear characteristics and cytological features of malignancy can be studied in these smears. The B in FNAB stands for biopsy; here, a core of tissue is examined for architectural characteristics or patterns. Pathological diagnosis of malignancy is made by using a combination of cytological and architectural disturbances. Despite advances in imaging modalities, histopathology and cytology still remain the gold standard for diagnostic confirmation of a disease.

Keywords

Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology Adenosine Deaminase Acid Fast Bacillus Cytology Smear Aspirate Material 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyDeenanath Mangeshkar Hospital and Research CenterErandwane, Pune, MaharashtraIndia
  2. 2.Department of Digestive Diseases and EndoscopyDeenanath Mangeshkar Hospital and Research CenterErandwane, Pune, MaharashtraIndia

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