Advertisement

Application of AIM/Enduse Model to Japan

  • Mikiko Kainuma
  • Yuzuru Matsuoka
  • Go Hibino
  • Koji Shimada
  • Hisaya Ishii
  • Shigekazu Matsui
  • Tsuneyuki Morita

Abstract

The AIM/Enduse model has been frequently applied to Japanese policy making processes. This chapter illustrates three of these applications. First, the effects of carbon tax and subsidies to reduce CO2 emissions in Japan are introduced. CO2 emissions through 2010 are estimated for four cases: reference case, market case, carbon tax case, and carbon tax+subsidies case. It is shown that the subsidy scheme is a useful option to reduce CO2 emissions. Second, ancillary benefits of CO2 reduction for regional environmental quality are presented. A module to analyze ancillary benefits of CO2 reduction is added to the original AIM/Enduse model. Emissions of CO2, NOx and PM in Aichi prefecture, Japan, are estimated through 2010 and it is shown that countermeasures to reduce CO2 emissions can also reduce air pollutants. Third, CO2 emission scenarios in Japan are quantified based on the four narrative scenarios for Japanese society and economy by referring to IPCC SRES scenarios.

Keywords

Emission Factor Residential Sector Fuel Cell Vehicle Aichi Prefecture Ancillary Benefit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Fuji Research Institute Corporation (2001) Report of the working group to draw up Japanese emissions scenarios. 150pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  2. Hibino G (2001) Japanese narrative scenarios and CO2 emissions. Prepared for Special Session of Society for Environmental Economic and Policy Studies. 9ppGoogle Scholar
  3. JEA (1994) Second interim report of the study group on economic system to mitigate global warming. Japan Environment Agency, pp19–24 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  4. JEA (1996a) Third interim report of the study group on economic system to mitigate global warming. Japan Environment Agency, pp47–63 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  5. JEA (1996b) Report of the meeting on environment problems of global scale, special committee on global warming. Japan Environment Agency, pp47–63 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  6. JEA (1997) Final report of the study group on economic incentives by environmental tax and surcharge. Japan Environment Agency, pp31,41–42 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  7. JEA (2000) Report of the study group on economic instruments in environmental policies. Japan Environment Agency, pp70–74, 95–96 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  8. Kainuma M, Matsuoka Y, Morita T, Hibino G (1999) Development of an end-use model for analyzing policy options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. IEEE Trans. Man and Cybern. Part C, 29(3):317–324CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Kainuma M, Matsuoka Y, Morita T (2000) The AIM/end-use model and its application to forecast Japanese carbon dioxide emissions. European Journal of Operational Research, 122:416–425CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Kainuma M, Matsuoka Y, Morita T (2001) CO2 emission forecast in Japan by AIM/end-use model. OPSEARCH, 38(1):109–125Google Scholar
  11. Kouken Association (1999) Ancillary-effects estimation model for local governments to improve their comprehensive environment. 207pp (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  12. MOE (2001) Interim report of the subcommittee on scenarios to achieve targets, global environment section. Central Environment Council, Ministry of the Environment, pp188–191 (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  13. Shimada K, Mizoguchi S, Hibino G, Matsuoka Y (2000) A study on the effects on local air quality of greenhouse gas mitigation measures. Environmental Systems Research 28: 77–84 (in Japanese)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Tsuchiya H (1997) Key technology policies to reduce CO2 emissions in Japan. WWF Japan, pp7–32Google Scholar
  15. Tsuchiya H (2001) WWF scenario for solving the global warming problem index for 2010 and 2020. WWF Japan, pp29–39Google Scholar
  16. Yang H, Kainuma M, Matsuoka Y (2001) Modeling the clean development mechanism: direct benefits, co-benefits and priorities. IFAC workshop on modeling and control in environmental issues, Yokohama, 103–108Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mikiko Kainuma
    • 1
  • Yuzuru Matsuoka
    • 2
  • Go Hibino
    • 3
  • Koji Shimada
    • 2
  • Hisaya Ishii
    • 3
  • Shigekazu Matsui
    • 3
  • Tsuneyuki Morita
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute for Environmental StudiesTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Kyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Fuji Research Institute CorporationTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations