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Toward the Construction of an Efficient Link Between Forest Recycling and Paper Recycling Using Trees with High Performance for Paper Recycling

  • Toshihiro Ona
  • Jyunsuke Kawana
  • Yoko Kibatani
  • Yukiko Ishikura
  • Yasuo Kojima
  • Takayuki Okayama
Conference paper

Abstract

After the Kyoto Protocol, considerable attentions have been paid on forests in the context of climate change. Forests have a key role in balancing society’s need for wood-based products and protecting our environment by increasing net carbon sequestration in terrestrial carbon sinks removing atmospheric CO2. The sustainably managed forests area is 187 million ha in 2000 and gains 4.5 million ha/year all over the world [1]. One of the forest management, the elite tree selection can improve forests in growth providing an effective way to remove more atmospheric CO2. However, since carbon sequestration is at its best in growing young trees, recycling forests by harvesting and planting trees are essential.

Keywords

Partial Little Square Partial Little Square Regression Fiber Wall Pulp Yield Paper Recycling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshihiro Ona
    • 1
  • Jyunsuke Kawana
    • 2
  • Yoko Kibatani
    • 2
  • Yukiko Ishikura
    • 3
  • Yasuo Kojima
    • 4
  • Takayuki Okayama
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Forest and Forest Products Sciences Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental SciencesKyushu UniversityHigashi-ku, FukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Agriculture Department of Environmental and Natural Resource ScienceTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchu, TokyoJapan
  3. 3.CREST of JST, Faculty of AgricultureTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchuJapan
  4. 4.Department of Forest Science Graduate School of AgricultureHokkaido UniversitySapporo, HokkaidoJapan

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