Advertisement

Wood Qualities of Some Tropical Plantation Species — Does Hastening the Growth Debase the Quality?

  • Takashi Okuyama
  • Hiroyuki Yamamoto
  • Imam Wahyudi
  • Yusuf Sudo Hadi
Conference paper

Abstract

It is the most important and an urgent task for humankind to establish the consistency between maintenance of global environment and sustainable supply of forest resources. In order to accomplish this task it is very important to encourage establishing forest plantations especially in the tropical regions. Recently, plantation forests have become very common in many tropical countries [1]. These plantations mainly aim to produce short rotation raw materials for pulp and paper. However to make this effort successful, it is necessary to establish an economical cycle between producer and consumer sectors by raising the added value of the plantation species. Developing timber use of the species is an essential way to raise the economical value of the short rotation trees. The growth rate of the tropical plantation species is faster than that of Temperate Zone species. Therefore, it is worried about that the inferior qualities due to the larger growth rate will take place during lumber processing. This investigation is focused mainly to the growth stress because the growth stress is the most important obstacle facing in the first place at sawing. Better understanding of the growth stress will contribute to raising timber value by linking the genetic improvement of tree, better afforestation technology and improved wood processing technologies [2]. From the above background, we have been conducting investigation on the effect of extremely high growth rate upon the growth stress and other properties of plantation species in Indonesia.

Keywords

Growth Stress Compression Wood Tension Wood Wood Quality Microfibril Angle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    FAO, Global Forest Resources Assessment 2000, Main report: FAO Forestry paper (2000) 140.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Okuyama, T., Kanagawa, Y. and Hattori, Y. Mokuzai Gakkaishi 33 (1987) 837.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Okuyama, T., Yamamoto, H., Yoshida, M., Hattori, Y. and Archer, R.R. Ann. Sci. For. 51 (1994) 291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. [4]
    Yamamoto, H., Okuyama, T. and Yoshida, M. Mokuzai Gakkaishi 39 (1993) 375.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Yamamoto H., Okuyama, T. and Yoshida, M. Mokuzai Gakkaishi 39 (1993) 118.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takashi Okuyama
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Imam Wahyudi
    • 2
  • Yusuf Sudo Hadi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Applied Biological Sciences Graduate school of Bioagricultural SciencesNagoya UniversityNagoya, AichiJapan
  2. 2.Faculty of ForestryBogor Agricultural UniversityBogorIndonesia

Personalised recommendations