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Assessment of Vessel Anatomical Features in Eucalyptus camaldulensis by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography

  • Hironori Haisaki
  • Mari Tateishi
  • Teruyuki Seino
  • Kokki Sakai
  • Toshihiro Ona
  • Jyunichi Ohshima
  • Kodai Adachi
  • Shinso Yokota
  • Nobuo Yoshizawa
Conference paper

Abstract

Eucalyptus camaldulensis plays an important role as one of the major plantation species for pulpwood especially in sub-tropical regions. Tree selection for high pulp yield and strength in the management of pulpwood forests has attracted interest in the use of plantations with short term rotations to reduce the pulp cost and atmospheric CO2 [1]. The non-destructive method is preferable in the quality breeding program and the increment core method has an advantage to handle many samples since the core can be drilled out easily from the trunk without felling the tree down [2]. However, the estimation of whole-tree properties by this indirect selection method requires significantly high relationships between wood and pulp properties.

Keywords

Lumen Area Show Correlation Coefficient Eucalyptus Camaldulensis Cell Perimeter Vessel Morphology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hironori Haisaki
    • 1
  • Mari Tateishi
    • 2
  • Teruyuki Seino
    • 3
  • Kokki Sakai
    • 2
  • Toshihiro Ona
    • 2
  • Jyunichi Ohshima
    • 4
  • Kodai Adachi
    • 4
  • Shinso Yokota
    • 4
  • Nobuo Yoshizawa
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Forest and Forest Products Sciences Faculty of AgricultureKyushu UniversityHigashi-ku, FukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Forest and Forest Products Sciences Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental SciencesKyushu UniversityHigashi-ku, FukuokaJapan
  3. 3.Institute for Environmental Management TechnologyTsukuba, IbarakiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Forest Science Faculty of AgricultureUtsunomiya UniversityUtsunomiya, TochigiJapan

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