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Within-Tree Variation of Detailed Fiber Morphology and Its Position Representing the Whole-Tree Value in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus

  • Jyunichi Ohshima
  • Shinso Yokota
  • Nobuo Yoshizawa
  • Toshihiro Ona
Conference paper

Abstract

Eucalyptus is one of the major plantation species for pulp wood in many countries. It is of importance to breed trees possessing high pulp yield and quality for the management of pulpwood forests. The selection of elite trees based on their quality has become increasingly significant from both environment issues and the reduction of pulp cost, especially for plantations with short rotations [1]. In the quality breeding program, the increment core method is preferably performed [2]. However, this is an indirect selection method that estimates whole-tree properties using the relationships between wood and pulp properties and requires a core-sampling position that will represent the whole-value. Fiber morphology is an important determinant of pulp properties in Eucalyptus. We examined the within-tree variation and the representative height in the trunk to indicate whole-tree values of fiber morphology (length, radial, tangential and average diameters, lumen diameter, and wall thickness) in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. globulus trees [3].

Keywords

Fiber Length Lumen Diameter Fiber Morphology Increment Core Eucalyptus Camaldulensis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Downes, G, Hudson, L, Raymond, C, Dean, G, Michell, T., Schimleck, L., Evans, R., and Muneri, A. Sampling plantation eucalyptus for wood and fibre poperties, CSIRO Publications, Melbourne, Australia (1997).Google Scholar
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    Ohshima, J., Yokota, S., Yoshizawa, N. and Ona, T. Appita J. (2003) in press.Google Scholar
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    Wilks, J. IAWA J. 9 (1988) 13.Google Scholar
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    Ona, T., Sonoda, T., Ito, K., Shibata, M., Tamai, Y. and Kojima, Y. Appita J. 49 (1996) 325.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jyunichi Ohshima
    • 1
  • Shinso Yokota
    • 1
  • Nobuo Yoshizawa
    • 1
  • Toshihiro Ona
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Forest Science Faculty of AgricultureUtsunomiya UniversityUtsunomiya, TochigiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Forest and Forest Products Sciences Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental SciencesKyushu UniversityHigashi-ku, FukuokaJapan

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