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The Protocol for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

  • Nariyuki Hayashi
  • Dalton W. Dietrich

Abstract

The main targets of brain hypothermia treatment are the adequate administration of oxygen, control of metabolic substrates, prevention of hypothalamuspituitary- adrenal (HPA) axis neurohormonal brain damage, and exclusion of selective neuronal damage to the dopamine A10 nervous system by controlling the brain tissue temperature to 32°–34°C [5, 6, 7]. The fundamental plan for brain hypothermia treatment is summarized in Fig. 39. After treatment, additional cerebral dopamine replacement therapy is followed to prevent memory disturbance and vegetation [4,5,7].

Keywords

Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Early Induction Brain Injured Patient Intra Cranial Pressure Hypothermia Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nariyuki Hayashi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dalton W. Dietrich
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Nihon University Emergency Medical CenterTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Emergency and Critical Care MedicineNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Neurological Surgery, Neurology and Cell Biology and AnatomyUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  4. 4.The Miami Project to Cure ParalysisMiamiUSA

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