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Trust pp 107-131 | Cite as

Trust as Social Intelligence

  • Toshio Yamagishi
Chapter
Part of the The Science of the Mind book series (The Science of the Mind)

Abstract

In this chapter, first I reexamine the theory of trust discussed in the previous ­chapters from an evolutionary game theoretic perspective. In so doing, I show that the theory has a theoretical missing link. Finally, I present results of a series of ­experiments which show that such missing link can be filled with “social intelligence.”

Keywords

Opportunity Cost Cognitive Resource Trial Period General Trust Payoff Matrix 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Behavioral Science Graduate School of LettersHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan

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