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Track-Based Control Measures for Ground Vibration – The Influence of Quasi-Static Loads and Dynamic Excitation

  • N. Triepaischajonsak
  • D. J. Thompson
  • C. J. C. Jones
  • J. Ryue
Part of the Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design book series (NNFM, volume 118)

Summary

Ground vibration from surface trains is induced by two main excitation mechanisms, due to the moving quasi-static loads and dynamic loads due to track roughness. The relative importance of these two mechanisms has been investigated using a semi-analytical model of the coupled vehicle, track and ground system. The track is represented as an infinite, layered beam resting on one or more elastic soil layers, overlying a three-dimensional half-space of ground material. The train is modelled as a multi-body system with both primary and secondary suspensions and its motion is included. The quasi-static and dynamic loads have been investigated over a wide range of conditions for locations close to the track and further away. Results are shown in terms of insertion gains for both dynamic and quasi-static components for a wide variety of conditions. It is confirmed that an assessment of the effect of a change in support stiffness should not be based on measurements too close to the track – in the case considered the distance should be at least 10 m to give representative results.

Keywords

Soft Clay Ground Vibration Train Speed Velocity Level Dynamic Excitation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Sheng, X., Jones, C.J.C., Thompson, D.J.: A comparison of a theoretical model for quasi-statically and dynamically induced environmental vibration from trains with measurements. Journal of Sound and Vibration 267, 621–635 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Triepaischajonsak, N., Thompson, D.J., Jones, C.J.C., Ryue, J., Priest, J.A.: Ground vibration from trains: experimental parameter characterisation and validation of a numerical model. To be published in Proceedings of Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part FGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Triepaischajonsak
    • 1
  • D. J. Thompson
    • 1
  • C. J. C. Jones
    • 1
  • J. Ryue
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Sound and Vibration ResearchUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK
  2. 2.School of Naval Architecture and Ocean EngineeringUniversity of UlsanUlsanKorea

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