Advertisement

Tuned Mass Damper for Rail Noise Control

  • Wilson Ho
  • Banting Wong
  • David England
Part of the Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design book series (NNFM, volume 118)

Summary

A new type of tuned mass damper has been developed to reduce rail vibration and noise radiation. The damper comprises multiple masses oscillating along the shear direction of resilient layers forming a multiple mass-—spring system. It provides effective broadband damping for a frequency range between 300Hz and 2500Hz. The resilient layers are aligned perpendicularly to the rail alignment such that each mass is allowed to oscillate in both vertical and lateral directions. The natural frequencies of the oscillating masses are individually tuned to match the rail vibration at multiple frequencies to cover both vertical and lateral pinned-—pinned resonance frequencies of the rail.

The damper is being installed on a curved track section in Hong Kong to study its noise reduction performance and influence on the corrugation growth rate. The vertical track decay rate is generally increased to 6-11dB/m at frequencies above 500Hz, while the lateral track decay rate is generally increased to 3-6dB/m at frequencies above 300Hz. The dampers reduce rail vibration by about 10dB(A) and noise level by 3.5dB(A). After installation of rail dampers, the sleeper blocks become the dominant noise sources.

Further investigation on the damper influence on corrugation growth is being conducted, and results will be published after completion of the 1-year trial test.

Keywords

Vibration Level Tune Mass Damper Noise Radiation Sound Power Level Railway Noise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Létourneaux, F., et al.: High Speed Railway Noise: Assessment of Mitigation Measures. Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design 99, 56–62Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Asmussen, B., et al.: Reducing the Noise Emission by Increasing the Damping of the Rail: Results of a Field Test. Notes on Numerical Fluid Mechanics and Multidisciplinary Design 99, 229–235Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Nelson, T.: TCRP Report 67 – Wheel and Rail Vibration Absorber Testing and Demonstration, Transportation Research Board, ch. 9, pp. 42–44 (2001) Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Thompson, D.J., et al.: A Tuned Damping Device for Reducing Noise from Railway Track. Applied Acoustics 68, 43–57 (2007)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    BS EN 15461: Railway Applications – Noise Emission – Characterization of the Dynamic Properties of Track Selections for Pass by Noise Measurement (2008) Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Thompson, D.J., et al.: Experimental Validation of the Twins Prediction Program For Rolling Noise, Part 1: Description of the Model and Method. Journal of Sound and Vibration 193(1), 123–135 (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Thompson, D.J., et al.: Experimental Validation of the Twins Prediction Program For Rolling Noise, Part 2: Results. Journal of Sound and Vibration 193(1), 123–135 (1996)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Nelson, T.: TCRP Report 23 – Wheel/Rail Noise Control Manual, Transportation Research Board, ch. 4, pp. 41–42 (1997)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wilson Ho
    • 1
  • Banting Wong
    • 1
  • David England
    • 2
  1. 1.Unit 616, Technology ParkWilson Acoustics LimitedShatinChina
  2. 2.MTR CorporationKowloon BayChina

Personalised recommendations