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Green Corridor Project: Planting Trees in the Savanna Between Bossou and Nimba

  • Tetsuro Matsuzawa
  • Gaku Ohashi
  • Tatyana Humle
  • Nicolas Granier
  • Makan Kourouma
  • Aly Gaspard Soumah
Part of the Primatology Monographs book series

Abstract

The present chapter aims to report on a reforestation program known as the “Green Corridor Project,” which was initiated in January 1997. This project aims to connect the chimpanzee habitat of Bossou to that of the Nimba Mountains. This project began with a pilot study known as the “Petit Jardin Botanique.” This study aimed to evaluate the plant species that would best thrive in a savanna environment. Over the years, the Green Corridor Project has involved the creation of tree nurseries, the introduction of hexatubes to protect the young trees, and the planting of cuttings of Spondias cythera trees. The Green Corridor Project has promoted environmental awareness in the locality.

Keywords

Local People Young Tree Reforestation Program Adjacent Community World Natural Heritage Site 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The Green Corridor Project has been promoted by the collaboration of researchers (KUPRI-International team), the governmental institute (IREB), and the local people of Bossou and Seringbara. The project of planting trees is partly supported by a grant from the Ministry of the Environment to Dr. Toshisada Nishida. Special thanks are due to Mr. Ryo Hasegawa, Mr. Paquilé Chérif, Mr. Gouano Goumi, Mr. Tino Zogbila, Mr. Boniface Zogbila, and others for their help with the different phases of the Green Corridor Project. The details of this long-term project are available on the following website: http://www.greenpassage.org/indexE.rhtml.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tetsuro Matsuzawa
    • 1
  • Gaku Ohashi
    • 1
  • Tatyana Humle
    • 2
  • Nicolas Granier
    • 3
  • Makan Kourouma
    • 4
  • Aly Gaspard Soumah
    • 4
  1. 1.Primate Research InstituteKyoto UniversityInuyamaJapan
  2. 2.School of Anthropology and Conservation, The Marlowe BuildingUniversity of KentCanterburyUK
  3. 3.Behavioral Biology Unit, Department of Environmental SciencesUniversity of Liège 22LiègeBelgium
  4. 4.Institut de Recherche Environnementale de BossouBossouRepublic of Guinea

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