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Alternative Medicine and Health Promotion

  • Shinko Ichinohe

Abstract

Recently it has come to be recognized that lifestyle diseases now occupy high rank as a cause of mortality, therefore primary prevention has become more important. In particular the lifestyle, behavioral changes, and the decision-making skill of the patient are deeply related to cancer as well as other lifestyle diseases. To overcome these diseases, not only a contemporary medical model but also a patient-centered or lifestyle-centered model has become important. In this chapter, we analyze the relationship between alternative medicine and health promotion to attempt to find new methods of maintaining health. We examined two forms of alternative medicine practiced in eastern Asia: Indian-Ayurvedic medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). These two types of alternative medicine are ancient in origin and widespread even now. Analysis of these alternative medicines delivers important findings. First, both Ayurveda and TCM treat “universe” as the most important factor, followed by “energy.” Both have an “individual-based” approach. “Balance” is considered to be important in both theories. Finally, a “preventive” effect also assumes importance. The theory of alternative medicine is very similar to the theory of health promotion. It is expected that following a reassessment of alternative medicine, the possibility will arise that it may be introduced to the overall concept of health promotion.

Keywords

Health Promotion Traditional Chinese Medicine Alternative Medicine Health Check Lifestyle Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jobu UniversityTakasakiJapan

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