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Prevention and Psychological Intervention in Depression and Stress-Related Conditions

  • Mutsuhiro Nakao
  • Takeaki Takeuchi
  • Peisen He
  • Hirono Ishikawa
  • Hiroaki Kumano

Abstract

This chapter focuses on depression and stress-related conditions to discuss possible strategies for the prevention or early management of such conditions. Health education constitutes the first important strategy, and we outline a school-based educational activity using a case-method approach. We next illustrate the impact of stressful events on psychological health with the results of a survey among Chinese individuals conducted after an unexpected epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2003. Communication plays an important role in the assessment and management services provided by medical practitioners to sick individuals, with very diverse backgrounds and levels of medical knowledge, who consult health care providers with concerns about their health. In this context, we introduce a recent advance in patient–doctor communication. Finally, we address the cognitive and behavioral features of those who suffer from depression and psychosocial stress. Based on our recent activities and on evidence pertaining to health promotion and education, we emphasize the importance of health education and communication in the prevention of stress-related diseases and the promotion of physical and psychological health.

Keywords

Cognitive Behavior Therapy Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Medical Encounter Public Health Emergency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The content of the sections written by all five authors was based primarily on the symposium, “Prevention and psychological intervention in depression and stress-related conditions,” held at the First Asia-Pacific Conference on Health Promotion and Education, Makuhari, Japan, on July 18, 2009. In addition, the content of the section authored by Drs Nakao, Takeuchi, and Ishikawa was partially based on the 7th Teikyo–Harvard Symposium, Itabashi, Japan, on June 26, 2009.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mutsuhiro Nakao
    • 1
  • Takeaki Takeuchi
    • 1
  • Peisen He
    • 2
  • Hirono Ishikawa
    • 3
  • Hiroaki Kumano
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Hygiene and Public Health & Division of Psychosomatic MedicineTeikyo University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Social Medicine Department of Public Health CollegeHarbin Medical UniversityNangang DistrictChina
  3. 3.Department of Medicine & CultureShiga University of Medical ScienceOtsu CityJapan
  4. 4.Waseda UniversityTokorozawa-cityJapan

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