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Conservation: Present Status of the Japanese Macaque Population and Its Habitat

  • Yasuyuki Muroyama
  • Aya Yamada
Part of the Primatology Monographs book series (PrimMono, volume 0)

Abstract

Worldwide, many primate species are in critical danger and threatened with extinction (Chapman and Peres 2001). This is the case for most Macaca species. Although macaques are often considered as well known or common, data on their present status including population numbers, distribution, and population trends are insufficient for most species, especially for those that are geographically widespread, such as rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and long-tailed (Macaca fascicularis) macaques. Available information suggests that most macaque species are experiencing a decline in numbers and/or distribution, although some populations appear to be recovering (Muroyama and Eudey 2004).

Keywords

Home Range Home Range Size Sika Deer Japanese Macaque Wild Food 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

I thank Y. Kishimoto for processing the data from Biodiversity Center of Japan, Ministry of Environment, Japan, and H. Sugiura and S. Yonezawa for drawing the figures. The findings reviewed in this chapter were obtained from research projects financed in part by the Cooperative Research Fund of the Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University, and the World Wide Fund for Nature Japan.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuyuki Muroyama
    • 1
  • Aya Yamada
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Nature and Environmental SciencesUniversity of Hyogo, and Wildlife Management Research CenterHyogoJapan
  2. 2.Primate Research InstituteKyoto UniversityInuyamaJapan

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