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Regional, Temporal, and Interindividual Variation in the Feeding Ecology of Japanese Macaques

  • Yamato Tsuji
Part of the Primatology Monographs book series (PrimMono, volume 0)

Abstract

The feeding ecology of primate species often reflects their foraging behavior, as primates are faced with decisions about what, when, and where to feed (Oates 1987). The feeding behaviors in turn affect their feeding success, which ultimately influences population parameters such as mortality and birth rate. Thus, primate research must consider factors affecting variation in feeding ecology to better understand population dynamics (e.g., Dunber 1987; Cheney et al. 1988; Clutton-Brock and Pemberton 2004), to appropriately test socioecological theory (e.g., Nakagawa 1998, see also Chap. 12), and to apply the knowledge to primate pest management (Naughton-Treves et al. 1998; Yamada and Muroyama 2010, see also Chap. 7).

Keywords

Home Range Food Habit Food Environment Japanese Macaque Dominance Rank 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Social Systems Evolution Section, Department of Ecology and Social Behavior, Primate Research InstituteKyoto UniversityInuyamaJapan

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