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Modes of Differentiation in Japanese Macaques: Perspectives from Population Genetics

  • Yoshi Kawamoto
Part of the Primatology Monographs book series (PrimMono, volume 0)

Abstract

In bisexually reproducing organisms, individuals in the same reproductive population share common genes. As genes accumulate mutations, genetic differentiation proceeds through time between reproductively different populations. Because of the lack of gene flow after speciation, different species show increased mutational differences, resulting in genetic diversity between species.

Keywords

Genetic Differentiation Japanese Macaque Molecular Genetic Marker Tohoku Region Aomori Prefecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

I thank Drs. K. Nozawa, T. Shotake, O. Takenaka, M. Aimi, T. Mouri, Y. Hamada, and N. Shigehara and Mr. Y. Mito for their encouragement and cooperation. I am indebted to the field biologists working on Japanese macaques through my population genetics study for their support with sample collections and field observations. I also thank Ms. S. Kawamoto, Dr. H. Tanaka, Mr. K. Tomari, Ms. S. Kawai, and Ms. A. Saitou for their support in laboratory analyses. The findings reviewed in this chapter were obtained from research projects financed by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (Grants-in-Aid for General Scientific Research Nos. 09640835 and 11440249, for Exploratory Research No. 15657058, and Challenging Exploratory Research No. 20651062).

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© Springer 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Genome Diversity Section, Department of Evolution and PhylogenyPrimate Research Institute, Kyoto UniversityInuyamaJapan

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